Pony meaning

pōnē
A horse of any of several stocky breeds that are small in size when full grown, such as the Shetland pony.
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(chiefly british) The sum of 25 pounds.
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To lead (a horse) with another horse.
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Something small for its kind, especially a small glass for beer or liqueur.
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A word-for-word translation of a foreign language text, especially one used as an aid in studying or test-taking.
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(informal) A literal translation of a work in a foreign language, used in doing schoolwork, often dishonestly; crib.
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(informal) Any young horse; foal.
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(slang) A racehorse.
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(brit., slang) The sum of twenty-five pounds.
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(slang) To pay (money), as to settle an account.
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Any of several small breeds of horse under 14.2 hands.
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(regional) A small serving of an alcoholic beverage.
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(Australia, New South Wales, Victoria) A serving of 140 millilitres of beer.
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(US, slang) A translation used as a study aid; loosely, a crib, a cheat-sheet.
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(Cockney rhyming slang) (from "pony and trap") Crap; rubbish, nonsense.
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To lead (a horse) from another horse.
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(Cockney rhyming slang) Of little worth.
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Archaic spelling of peony.
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A horse of any of a number of small breeds, usually not over 58 inches high at the withers.
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(UK, slang) Twenty-five pounds sterling.
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Origin of pony

  • Probably from obsolete French poulenet diminutive of poulain colt from Late Latin pullāmen young of an animal from Latin pullus pau-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • 1659 from Scots powny, apparently from Middle French poulenet (“little foal"), ultimately from Late Latin pullanus (“young of an animal") (cognate to English foal).

    From Wiktionary

  • Shortened from pony and trap, rhyming with crap

    From Wiktionary