Passage definition

păsĭj
To make a passage, or voyage; journey.
verb
14
6
(medicine) The introduction of an instrument into a bodily cavity.
noun
5
0
Enactment into law of a legislative bill.
noun
6
2
A path, channel, or duct through, over, or along which something may pass.

The nasal passages.

noun
4
0
A journey, especially one by air or water.

We had a rough passage on the stormy sea.

noun
5
2
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The right, permission, or power to come and go freely.

Only medical supply trucks were granted safe passage through enemy territory.

noun
5
2
The charge for such accommodations.
noun
3
0
(obsolete) Death.
noun
2
0
The accommodations of a passenger, esp. on a ship.
noun
2
0
A short segment of a written work or speech.

A Bible passage.

noun
2
0
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A section or detail of a painting, drawing, etc.
noun
2
0
(medicine) The introduction of an instrument into a bodily cavity.
noun
2
0
The process of changing from one condition or stage to another; transition.

The passage from childhood to adulthood.

noun
2
1
(music) A short section of a composition, especially one displaying technical skill.
noun
2
1
A path, channel, or duct through, over, or along which something may pass.

The nasal passages.

noun
1
0
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A corridor.
noun
1
0
A journey, esp. by water; voyage.
noun
6
6
Passage is moving through something, being granted permission to move through something or an enclosed area that you must move through to get to somewhere else.

An example of passage is when you go on a trip and someone tells you to be safe in your travels.

An example of passage is when a car moves through a restricted area with permission.

An example of passage is when time moves forward.

An example of passage is a corridor or hall in your home leading from one room to another.

noun
4
4
(physiology) The process of discharging something from a bodily part, such as evacuation of waste from the bowels.
noun
3
3
To cause (a horse) to execute such a trot in dressage.
verb
2
2
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(physiology) The process of discharging something from a bodily part, such as evacuation of waste from the bowels.
noun
1
1
The right to travel as a passenger, especially on a ship.

Book passage; pay for one's passage.

noun
1
1
A corridor.
noun
1
1
An occurrence or event.
noun
1
1
Something, such as an exchange of words or blows, that occurs between two persons.

A passage at arms.

noun
1
1
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A segment of a written work or speech.

A celebrated passage from Shakespeare.

noun
1
1
(music) A segment of a composition, especially one that demonstrates the virtuousity of the composer or performer.

A passage of exquisite beauty, played to perfection.

noun
1
1
A section of a painting or other piece of artwork; a detail.
noun
1
1
A slow cadenced trot in which the horse raises and returns to the ground first one diagonal pair of feet, then the other.
noun
1
1
That which happens or takes place between persons; interchange, as of blows or words.
noun
1
1
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(med.) A bowel movement.
noun
1
1
A way or means of passing.
  • A road or path.
  • A channel, duct, etc.
  • A hall or corridor that is an entrance or exit or onto which several rooms open; passageway.
noun
4
5
The act or process of passing, especially:
  • Movement from one place to another.
    The passage of water through a sieve.
  • The process of elapsing.
    The passage of time.
noun
2
3
To execute such a trot in dressage.
verb
2
3
The act of passing.
  • Movement from one place to another; migration.
    Birds of passage.
  • Change or progress from one process or condition to another; transition.
  • The enactment of a law by a legislative body.
noun
2
3
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Permission, right, or a chance to pass.
noun
1
3

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
passage
Plural:
passages

Origin of passage

  • French from passager to execute a passage alteration (influenced by passer to pass) of passéger from Italian passeggiare from passare to pass from Vulgar Latin passāre from Latin passus step pace1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French from passer to pass pass

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition