Wait meaning

wāt
(informal) To delay (a meal or an event); postpone.

They waited lunch for us.

verb
10
5
The act or fact of waiting.
noun
7
0
To be ready or at hand.

Dinner was waiting for them.

verb
7
3
To remain temporarily undone or neglected.

Let that job wait.

verb
6
3
A period of waiting.

A four-hour wait.

noun
5
1
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To serve food at a meal.

To wait at table, to wait on a person.

verb
3
2

I had a very long wait at the airport security check.

noun
2
0
(informal) To delay serving (a meal) as in waiting for someone.

To wait dinner.

verb
2
2
(obs.) To attend as a consequence.
verb
2
3
(intransitive) To delay movement or action until some event or time; to remain neglected or in readiness.

Wait here until your car arrives.

verb
1
0
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(intransitive, US) To wait tables; to serve customers in a restaurant or other eating establishment.

She used to wait down at the Dew Drop Inn.

verb
1
0
Rowe.

Remorse and heaviness of heart shall wait thee, / And everlasting anguish be thy portion.

verb
1
0
An ambush.

They laid in wait for the patrol.

noun
1
0
(in the plural, archaic, UK) Musicians who sing or play at night or in the early morning, especially at Christmas time; serenaders; musical watchmen. [formerly waites, wayghtes.]
noun
1
0
To wait is defined as to stay or remain in one place until something happens.

An example of to wait is standing in line for movie theater tickets.

An example of to wait is expecting dinner guests to show up at your house who don't show until dessert.

verb
1
1
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To remain or be in readiness.

Lunch is waiting at the counter.

verb
1
1
To remain temporarily neglected, unattended to, or postponed.

The trip will have to wait.

verb
1
1
To work as a waiter or waitress.
verb
1
1
To remain or stay in expectation of; await.

Wait one's turn.

verb
1
1
To be a waiter or waitress at.

Wait tables.

verb
1
1
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The act of waiting or the time spent waiting.
noun
1
1
To stay in a place or remain in readiness or in anticipation (until something expected happens or for someone to arrive or catch up)
verb
1
1
(obs.) A member of a band of musicians formerly employed by a city or town in England to play at entertainments.
noun
1
1
(obs.) A watchman.
noun
1
1
(now rare) To delay movement or action until the arrival or occurrence of; to await. (Now generally superseded by "wait for".)
verb
1
1
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To be, remain, or delay in expectation or anticipation of; await.

To wait orders, to wait one's turn.

verb
0
2
(obs.) To attend upon or escort, esp. as a token of respect or honor.
verb
0
2
In England,
  • Any of a group of singers and musicians who go through the streets at Christmastime performing songs and carols for small gifts of money.
  • Any tune so performed.
noun
0
2
cannot wait
  • to anticipate eagerly
idiom
0
1
lie in wait (for)
  • to wait so as to catch after planning an ambush or trap (for)
idiom
0
1
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wait on
  • to act as a servant to
  • to call on or visit (esp. a superior) in order to pay one's respects, ask a favor, etc.
  • to result from; be a consequence of
  • to supply the needs or requirements of (a person at table, a customer in a store, etc.), as a waiter, clerk, etc.
  • to wait for; await
idiom
0
0
wait out
  • to remain inactive during the course of
idiom
0
0
wait table
  • to serve food as a waiter or servant to people at a table
idiom
0
0
wait up
  • to put off going to bed until someone expected arrives or something expected happens
  • to stop and wait for someone to catch up
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

cannot wait
lie in wait (for)
wait table

Origin of wait

  • Middle English waiten from Old North French waitier to watch of Germanic origin weg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English waiten, wayten, from Old Northern French waiter, waitier (compare French guetter from Old French gaiter, guaitier), from Old Frankish *wahtōn, *wahtjan (“to watch, guard"), derivative of *wahta (“guard, watch"), from Proto-Germanic *wahtwō (“guard, watch"), from Proto-Indo-European *weǵ- (“to be fresh, cheerful, awake"). Cognate with Old High German wahtÄ“n (“to watch, guard"), Dutch wachten (“to wait, expect"), French guetter (“to watch out for"), North Frisian wachtjen (“to stand, stay put"). More at watch.

    From Wiktionary