Waive meaning

wāv
To give up (a claim or right, for example) voluntarily; relinquish.
verb
2
0
Waive is defined as to give up your right to something or to determine that someone else can postpone fulfilling an obligation.

An example of waive is when you sign a release of liability after a car accident settlement agreeing not to sue.

An example of waive is when you let someone avoid fees.

verb
1
0
To put off until later; postpone; defer.
verb
1
0
To refrain from insisting on or enforcing (a rule, penalty, or requirement, for example); dispense with.
verb
0
0
(sports) To place (a player) on waivers.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To give up or forgo (a right, claim, privilege, etc.)
verb
0
0
To refrain from insisting on or taking advantage of.
verb
0
0
(sports) To put (a player) on waivers.
verb
0
0
To voluntarily give up, abandon, or surrender a right, privilege or claim. Usually, a right may only be waived if the person so doing has full knowledge of what the consequences might be.
verb
0
0
To abstain from insisting on a formality, such as an extradition hearing prior to extradition.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
(law) To relinquish (a right etc.); to give up claim to; to forego.

If you waive the right to be silent, anything you say can be used against you in a court of law.

verb
0
0
(now rare) To put aside, avoid.
verb
0
0
(obsolete) To move from side to side; to sway.
verb
0
0
(intransitive, obsolete) To stray, wander.
verb
0
0
(obsolete, law) A woman put out of the protection of the law; an outlawed woman.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(obsolete) A waif; a castaway.

noun
0
0
Obsolete form of waif.
noun
0
0
(law) To forgo or relinquish voluntarily (a right, privilege, claim, etc. which one is legally entitled to enforce)
verb
0
1
To refrain from engaging in, sometimes temporarily; cancel or postpone.

Let's waive our discussion of that problem.

verb
0
2

Origin of waive

  • Middle English weiven to abandon from Anglo-Norman weyver from waif ownerless property waif1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English weyven, from Old Norse veifa (“to wave, swing") (Norwegian veiva), from Proto-Germanic *waibijanÄ….

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English weyven, from Anglo-Norman weyver (“to abandon, allow to become a waif"), from weyf (“waif").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Anglo-Norman waive, probably as the past participle of weyver, as Etymology 1, above.

    From Wiktionary

  • Variant forms.

    From Wiktionary