Excuse meaning

ĭk-skyo͝oz
The definition of an excuse is an explanation or a reason for an action.

An example of an excuse is a student saying that his dog ate his homework.

noun
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Excuse is defined as to forgive, pardon or free from an obligation.

An example of to excuse is to allow a child to leave the table after dinner.

verb
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To give permission to leave; release.

The child ate quickly and asked to be excused.

verb
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A release from obligation, duty, etc.
noun
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To try to free (a person) of blame; seek to exonerate.
verb
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To serve as an explanation or justification for; justify; exculpate; absolve.

A selfish act that nothing will excuse.

verb
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A plea in defense of or explanation for some action or behavior; apology.
noun
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An explanation offered to justify or obtain forgiveness.
noun
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A reason or grounds for excusing.

Ignorance is no excuse for breaking the law.

noun
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The act of excusing.
noun
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(informal) An inferior example.

A poor excuse for a poet; a sorry excuse for a car.

noun
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To try to minimize or pardon (a fault); apologize or give reasons for.
verb
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To consider (an offense or fault) as not important; overlook; pardon.

Excuse my rudeness.

verb
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To release from an obligation, duty, promise, etc.
verb
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To permit to leave.
verb
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To serve as justification for.

Witty talk does not excuse bad manners.

verb
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To free, as from an obligation or duty; exempt.

She was excused from jury duty because she knew the plaintiff.

verb
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Something that excuses; extenuating or justifying factor.
noun
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A pretended reason for conduct; pretext.
noun
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A defense or justification of an individual’s act or failure to act; a defense in criminal law that an individual’s actions cannot constitute a crime because of coercion, or some other cause that places the actions beyond the individual’s volition or control.
noun
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To forgive; to pardon.

I excused him his transgressions.

verb
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To allow to leave.

May I be excused from the table?

I excused myself from the proceedings to think over what I'd heard.

verb
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To provide an excuse for; to explain, with the aim of alleviating guilt or negative judgement.

You know he shouldn't have done it, so don't try to excuse his behavior!

verb
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To relieve of an imputation by apology or defense; to make apology for as not seriously evil; to ask pardon or indulgence for.
verb
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An explanation designed to avoid or alleviate guilt or negative judgment.

Tell me why you were late – and I don't want to hear any excuses!

noun
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(law) A defense to a criminal or civil charge wherein the accused party admits to doing acts for which legal consequences would normally be appropriate, but asserts that special circumstances relieve that party of culpability for having done those acts.
noun
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(with negative adjective prepositioned, especially sorry or poor) An example.

That thing is a poor excuse for a gingerbread man. Hasn't anyone taught you how to bake?

He's a sorry excuse of a doctor.

noun
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A note explaining an absence.
noun
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Excuse me
  • Used to acknowledge and ask forgiveness for an action that could cause offense.
  • Used to request that a statement be repeated.
idiom
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a poor excuse for
  • a very inferior example of
idiom
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excuse me
  • I am sorry; pardon me
  • please repeat or clarify what you just said
idiom
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excuse oneself
  • to ask that one's fault be overlooked; apologize
  • to ask for permission to leave
idiom
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make one's excuses
  • to express one's regret over not being able to attend a social gathering, etc.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

a poor excuse for
excuse oneself
make one's excuses

Origin of excuse

  • Middle English excusen from Old French excuser from Latin excūsāre ex- ex- causa accusation cause

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English excusen, from Old French escuser, from Latin excūsō (“to excuse, allege in excuse, literally, free from a charge”), from ex (“out”) + causa (“a charge”); see cause and accuse.

    From Wiktionary