Claim definition

klām
A basis for demanding something; a title or right.
noun
48
5
To deserve or call for; require.

Problems that claim her attention.

verb
27
6
To state to be true, especially when open to question; assert or maintain.

Claimed he had won the race; a candidate claiming many supporters.

verb
17
4
Something claimed in a formal or legal manner, especially a tract of public land staked out by a miner or homesteader.
noun
15
2
To state as a fact or as one's belief (something that may be called into question); assert.
verb
12
0
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A demand for something rightfully or allegedly due.
noun
8
0
To demand or ask for as rightfully belonging or due to one; assert one's right to (a title, accomplishment, etc. that should be recognized)

To claim a record in the high jump.

verb
5
1
A statement, as a fact, of something that may be called into question; assertion.
noun
4
0
A right or title to something.

Her sole claim to fame.

noun
3
0
To call for; require; deserve.

A problem that claims attention.

verb
4
2
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Something claimed.
  • A piece of land staked out by a settler or miner.
  • Money demanded for an insurance settlement.
noun
4
2
The definition of a claim is a demand for something which is due.

An example of claim is a document given to the insurance company stating money is wanted for car damages.

noun
1
0
A new statement of truth made about something, usually when the statement has yet to be verified.
noun
1
0
To state a new fact, typically without providing evidence to prove it is true.
verb
1
0
To call or name.

verb
1
0
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To take in a violent manner as if by right.

A hurricane that claimed two lives.

verb
1
1
Claim means to take or assert ownership of something or to state something as true.

An example of claim is to recover a lost jacket from the lost and found.

An example of claim is to announce that a specific person was responsible for a specific mistake.

verb
0
0
A statement of something as a fact; an assertion of truth.

Makes no claim to be a cure.

noun
0
0
A demand for payment in accordance with an insurance policy or other formal arrangement.
noun
0
0
The sum of money demanded.
noun
0
0
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A demand for money or property. An assertion that one is entitled to, or the perceived or actual right to receive, money or property. The totality of facts that gives rise to a right to receive money or property that is enforceable in court. In some states and in the federal courts, the same as claim for relief.
noun
0
0
A demand of ownership made for something (eg. claim ownership, claim victory).
noun
0
0
A demand of ownership for previously unowned land (eg. in the gold rush, oil rush)
noun
0
0
(law) A legal demand for compensation or damages.
noun
0
0
verb
0
0
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To demand ownership or right to use for land.
verb
0
0
(law) To demand compensation or damages through the courts.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To be entitled to anything; to deduce a right or title; to have a claim.
verb
0
0
To proclaim.

verb
0
0
To demand, ask for, or take as one's own or one's due.

Claim a reward; claim one's luggage at the airport carousel.

verb
0
1
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A demand for something as rightful or due.
noun
0
1
lay claim to
  • To assert one's right to or ownership of.
idiom
0
0
lay claim to
  • to assert one's right or title to
idiom
1
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
claim
Plural:
claims

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

lay claim to
lay claim to

Origin of claim

  • Middle English claimen from Old French clamer claim- from Latin clāmāre to call kelə-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English claimen, from Old French claimer, clamer (“to call, name, send for”), from Latin clāmō (“to call, cry out”), from Proto-Indo-European *kele- (“to shout”), which is imitative; see also Lithuanian kalba (“language”), Old English hlowan (“to low, make a noise like a cow”), Old High German halan (“to call”), Ancient Greek καλέω (kaleō, “to call, convoke”), κλεδον (kledon, “report, fame”), κέλαδος (kelados, “noise”), Middle Irish cailech (“cock”), Latin calō (“to call out, announce solemnly”), Sanskrit उषःकाल (uṣaḥkāla, “cock, literally dawn-calling”).

    From Wiktionary