Delay meaning

dĭ-lā
To delay is defined as to postpone, make late or stop for awhile.

An example of to delay is a snow storm making a flight late.

verb
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To postpone until a later time; defer.
verb
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To cause to be later or slower than expected or desired.

Heavy traffic delayed us.

verb
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The interval of time between two events.
noun
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To put off to a future time; postpone.
verb
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To make late; slow up; detain.
verb
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To stop for a while; linger.
verb
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A delaying or being delayed.
noun
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The period of time for which something is delayed.
noun
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The total time required for a signal to travel from one point to another, generally from a transmitter through a network to a receiver. See also delay skew and latency.
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To put off until a later time; to defer.
verb
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To act or move slowly; put off an action or a decision.
verb
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The act of delaying; postponement.

Responded without delay.

noun
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The condition of being delayed; detainment.
noun
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The period of time during which one is delayed.
noun
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To retard; to stop, detain, or hinder, for a time.

The mail is delayed by a heavy fall of snow.

verb
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A period of time before an event occurs; the act of delaying; procrastination; lingering inactivity.

The delay before the echo of a sound.

noun
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(obsolete) To dilute, temper.
verb
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(obsolete) To assuage, quench, allay.
verb
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Origin of delay

  • Middle English delaien from Anglo-Norman delaier from Old French deslaier des- de- laier to leave of Germanic origin leip- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English delaien, from Anglo-Norman delaier, Old French deslaier, from des- + Old French laier (“to leave”), a conflation of Old Frankish *latjan ("to delay, hinder"; from Proto-Germanic *latjaną (“to delay, hinder, stall”), from Proto-Indo-European *le(i)d- (“to leave, leave behind”)), and Old Frankish *laibjan ("to leave"; from Proto-Germanic *laibijaną (“to leave, cause to stay”), from Proto-Indo-European *leip- (“to remain, continue”)). Akin to Old English latian (“to delay, hesitate”), Old English latu (“a delay, a hindrance”), Old English lǣfan (“to leave”). More at let (to hinder), late, leave.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle French délayer, ultimately from Latin dis- + ligāre.

    From Wiktionary