Late definition

lāt
After the expected, usual, or proper time.

A train that arrived late; woke late and had to skip breakfast.

adverb
12
2
Recently; lately.

As late as yesterday.

adverb
12
3
Having been so recently but not now.

Our late allies.

adjective
5
1
After the usual, proper, or expected time; tardily.
adverb
3
1
Happening, appearing, etc. just prior to the present time; recent.

A late news bulletin.

adjective
2
1
Advertisement
At or until an advanced time of the day, night, year, etc.
adverb
1
0
Toward the end of a given period, development, etc.
adverb
1
0
Happening, coming, etc. after the usual, proper, or expected time; tardy; behindhand.
adjective
1
1
The definition of late is something that happens or someone that arrives after the expected time.

An example of late is someone showing up to breakfast in the afternoon.

An example of late is a show that was supposed to start at four beginning at four thirty.

adjective
0
0
Of or toward the end or more advanced part, as of a period or stage.

The late 19th century; a later symptom of the disease.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Coming, occurring, continuing, or remaining after the correct, usual, or expected time; delayed.

A late breakfast; a late meeting.

adjective
0
0
Occurring at an advanced hour, especially well into the evening or night.

A late movie on television; the late flight to Denver.

adjective
0
0
Having begun or occurred just previous to the present time; recent.

A late development.

adjective
0
0
Contemporary; up-to-date.

The latest fashion.

adjective
0
0
Having recently occupied a position or place.

The company's late president gave the address.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Dead, especially if only recently deceased.

In memory of the late explorer.

adjective
0
0
Recently.

As late as last week he was still in town.

adverb
0
0
At or until an advanced hour.

Talked late into the evening.

adverb
0
0
At or into an advanced period or stage.

A project undertaken late in her career.

adverb
0
0
Having recently died.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Happening, being, continuing, etc. far on in the day, night, year, etc.

The late afternoon, a late party.

adjective
0
0
Happening, being, continuing, etc. toward the end; far advanced in a period, development, etc.

The late Middle Ages.

adjective
0
0
Near the end of a period of time.

It was late in the evening when we finally arrived.

adjective
0
0
Specifically, near the end of the day.

It was getting late and I was tired.

adjective
0
0
(usually not used comparatively) Associated with the end of a period.

Late Latin is less fully inflected than classical Latin.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Not arriving until after an expected time.

Even though we drove as fast as we could, we were still late.

Panos was so late that he arrived at the meeting after Antonio, who had the excuse of being in hospital for most of the night.

adjective
0
0
Not having had an expected menstrual period.

I'm late, honey. Could you buy a test?

adjective
0
0
(not comparable, euphemistic) Deceased, dead: used particularly when speaking of the dead person's actions while alive. (Often used with the; see usage notes.)

Her late husband had left her well provided for.

The piece was composed by the late Igor Stravinsky.

adjective
0
0
Existing or holding some position not long ago, but not now; departed, or gone out of office.

The late bishop of London; the late administration.

adjective
0
0
Recent "” relative to the noun it modifies.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
(informal) A shift (scheduled work period) that takes place late in the day or at night.
noun
0
0
After a deadline has passed, past a designated time.

We drove as fast as we could, but we still arrived late.

adverb
0
0
of late
  • Recently; lately:
    Was feeling better of late.
idiom
1
0
late on
  • at a late stage; near the end
idiom
1
0
of late
  • lately
idiom
1
0
Advertisement

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
late
Plural:
lates

Adjective

Base Form:
late
Comparative:
later
Superlative:
latest

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of late

  • Middle English from Old English læt lē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English late, lat, from Old English læt (“slow; slack, lax, negligent; late"), from Proto-Germanic *lataz (“slow, lazy"), from Proto-Indo-European *lÄ“(y)d- (“to weaken, tire, relax, subside"). Cognate with Scots lat (“late"), West Frisian let (“late"), Dutch laat (“late"), Low German laat (“late"), German lass (“dull, limp"), Swedish lat (“idle, lazy"), Icelandic latur (“lazy"), Latin lassus (“weary, faint").

    From Wiktionary