Deep definition

dēp
Extremely grave or serious.

In deep trouble.

adjective
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Dark and rich.

A deep red.

adjective
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Extending far downward from the top or top edges, inward from the surface, or backward from the front.

A deep cut, a deep lake, a deep drawer.

adjective
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2
Deep means a part of water, earth or space that is known to be one of most extreme known to science.

An example of deep is a part of the ocean that goes down more than 18,000 feet below the surface.

noun
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Strongly felt.

Deep love.

adjective
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(naut.) Any of the unmarked fathom points between those marked on a lead line.
noun
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The ocean.
noun
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The definition of deep is going far down or far away, something strongly felt, or something that is hard to understand.

An example of deep is a hole that goes miles underground.

An example of deep is a love between old friends.

An example of deep is a thought that is very difficult to express.

adjective
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1
Deep is defined as at a great depth or a long period of time or space.

An example of deep is digging far into the sea.

An example of deep is working late into the night or running far back into the opponent's zone to catch a football throw.

adverb
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1
The most intense or extreme part.

The deep of night.

noun
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Covered or surrounded to a designated degree. Often used in combination.

Waist-deep in the water; ankle-deep in snow.

adjective
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Large in quantity or size; big.

Deep cuts in the budget.

adjective
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(sports) Having a sufficient number of capable reserve players.

That team is not very deep.

adjective
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Extending far downward below a surface.

A deep hole in the river ice.

adjective
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Extending far inward from an outer surface.

A deep cut.

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Extending far backward from front to rear.

A deep walk-in refrigerator.

adjective
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Extending far from side to side from a center.

A deep yard surrounding the house.

adjective
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Far distant down or in.

Deep in the woods.

adjective
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Coming from or penetrating to a depth.

A deep sigh.

adjective
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(sports) Located or taking place near the outer boundaries of the area of play.

Deep left field.

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Difficult to penetrate or understand; recondite.

A deep metaphysical theory.

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Of a mysterious or obscure nature.

A deep secret; ancient and deep tribal rites.

adjective
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Very learned or intellectual; wise.

A deep philosopher.

adjective
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Exhibiting great cunning or craft.

Deep political machinations.

adjective
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Of a grave or extreme nature.

Deep trouble; deepest deceit.

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Very absorbed or involved.

Deep in thought; deep in financial difficulties.

adjective
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Profound in quality or feeling.

A deep trance; deep devotion.

adjective
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The extent of encompassing time or space; firmament.
noun
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(nautical) A distance estimated in fathoms between successive marks on a sounding line.
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A deep place in land or in a body of water.

Drowned in the deep of the river.

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A vast, immeasurable extent.

The deep of outer space.

noun
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Extending down, inward, etc. a specified length or distance.

Water eight feet deep.

adjective
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Far off in time or space.

The deep past.

adjective
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Intellectually profound.

A deep discussion.

adjective
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Sunk in or absorbed by.

Deep in thought.

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Much involved.

Deep in debt.

adjective
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Of low pitch or range.

A deep voice.

adjective
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Large; big.

Deep cuts in the budget.

adjective
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(sports) Having many good players in reserve.

A team deep in pitching.

adjective
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Located far down or back.

Deep in the outfield.

adjective
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Coming from or going far down or back.

A deep breath.

adjective
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Tricky and sly; devious.

Deep dealings.

adjective
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Carefully guarded.

A deep secret.

adjective
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Great in degree; intense.

Deep joy.

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Heavy and unbroken.

A deep sleep.

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A deep place or any of the deepest parts, as in water or earth.
noun
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The extent of encompassing space or time, of the unknown, etc.
noun
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The middle part; part that is darkest, most silent, etc.

In the deep of night.

noun
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In a deep way or to a deep extent; far down, far in, far back, etc.

To dig deep.

adverb
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A physical distance: vertical or horizontal or both.
  • (of a hole, water, ravine, cut, etc.) Having its bottom far down.
    We hiked into a deep valley between tall mountains.
  • In extent, in a direction away from the observer (but generally not upward).
    The shelves are 30 centimetres deep.
  • In a number of rows or layers.
    A crowd three deep along the funeral procession.
  • That cyclist's deep chest allows him to draw more air.
    There was a deep layer of soot over the window.
  • To take a deep breath / sigh / drink.
  • A long way inside; situated far in or back.
    Deep into the forest; deep in the forest.
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(intellectual, social) Complex, involved.
  • Profound, having great meaning or import, but possibly obscure or not obvious.
    That is a deep thought!.
  • I just meant to help out a little, but now I'm deep into it.
    They're deep in discussion.
  • Hard to penetrate or comprehend; profound; intricate; obscure.
    A deep subject or plot.
  • Of penetrating or far-reaching intellect; not superficial; thoroughly skilled; sagacious; cunning.
adjective
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(sound, voice) Low in pitch.

She has a very deep contralto voice.

adjective
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(of a col) Dark and highly saturated.

That's a very deep shade of blue.

adjective
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(sleep) Sound, heavy (describing a state of sleep from which one is not easily awoken).

He was in a deep sleep.

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Immersed, submerged (in).

Deep in debt; deep in the mud.

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Muddy; boggy; sandy; said of roads.
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adverb
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(literary, with "the") The deep part of a lake, sea, etc.

Creatures of the deep.

noun
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(US, rare) The profound part of a problem.
noun
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(with "the") The sea, the ocean.
noun
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(cricket) A fielding position near the boundary.

Russell is a safe pair of hands in the deep.

noun
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Rich and intense in shade. Used of a color.

A deep red.

adjective
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Low in pitch; resonant.

A deep voice.

adjective
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To a great depth; deeply.

Dig deep; feelings that run deep.

adverb
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Well along in time; late.

Worked deep into the night.

adverb
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(sports) Close to the outer boundaries of the area of play.

Played deep for the first three innings; ran deep into their opponents' territory.

adverb
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Hard to understand; abstruse.

A deep book.

adjective
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Extending a specific distance in a given direction.

Snow four feet deep.

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Far distant in time or space.

Deep in the past.

adjective
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2
deep down
  • At bottom; basically:
    Deep down, she was still a rebel.
idiom
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in deep water
  • In difficulty.
idiom
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(informal) go off the deep end
  • to behave in a rash or reckless manner
  • to go insane
idiom
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in deep water
  • in trouble or difficulty
idiom
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the deep
  • the sea or ocean
idiom
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
deep
Plural:
deeps

Adjective

Base Form:
deep
Comparative:
deeper
Superlative:
deepest

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

in deep water
go off the deep end
in deep water
the deep

Origin of deep

  • Middle English dep from Old English dēop dheub- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English depe, from Old English dēop (“deep, profound; awful, mysterious; heinous; serious, solemn, earnest; extreme, great”), from Proto-Germanic *deupaz (“deep”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰéwbus, from *dʰewb- (“deep”). Cognate with Scots depe (“deep”), Eastern Frisian djap (“deep”), West Frisian djip (“deep”), Low German deep (“deep”), Dutch diep (“deep”), German tief (“deep”), Danish dyb (“deep”), Norwegian dyp (“deep”), Swedish djup (“deep”), Icelandic djúpur (“deep”), Lithuanian dubùs (“deep, hollow”), Albanian det (“sea”), Welsh dwfn (“deep”).

    From Wiktionary