Profound definition

prə-found, prō-
Frequency:
Deeply felt or held; intense.

Profound contempt; a profound conviction.

adjective
38
8
Having, showing, or requiring great insight or understanding.

A profound thinker; a profound analysis.

adjective
38
9
Situated at, extending to, or coming from a great depth; deep.

A profound chasm.

adjective
36
8
Something profound.
noun
32
14
Marked by intellectual depth.

A profound discussion.

adjective
18
5
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Intensely felt.

Profound grief.

adjective
12
2
Very deep or low.

A profound abyss, sleep, etc.

adjective
9
2
Unbroken.

A profound silence.

adjective
11
5
Thoroughgoing.

Profound changes.

adjective
5
3
Thoroughgoing; far-reaching.

Profound social changes.

adjective
2
0
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adjective
2
0
Very deep; very serious.
adjective
2
0
Unqualified or unbroken.

A profound silence; profound sleep.

adjective
4
3
(archaic) An abyss or deep, as of the ocean.
noun
2
1
Intellectually deep; entering far into subjects; reaching to the bottom of a matter, or of a branch of learning; thorough; as, a profound investigation or treatise; a profound scholar; profound wisdom.
adjective
0
0
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Characterized by intensity; deeply felt; pervading; overmastering; far-reaching; strongly impressed; as, a profound sleep.
adjective
0
0
Bending low, exhibiting or expressing deep humility; lowly; submissive; as, a profound bow.
adjective
0
0
(obsolete) The deep; the sea; the ocean.

God in the fathomless profound / Hath all this choice commanders drowned. Sandys.

noun
0
0
(obsolete) An abyss.

noun
0
0
(obsolete) To cause to sink deeply; to cause to dive or penetrate far down.

verb
0
0
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(obsolete) To dive deeply; to penetrate.
verb
0
0
The definition of profound is being deep, having intellectual depth or being intensely felt.

An example of profound is a scientific equation proving God's existence.

adjective
1
3

Origin of profound

  • Middle English profounde from Old French profond deep from Latin profundus prō- before pro–1 fundus bottom

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Late Anglo-Norman profound, from Old French profont, from Latin profundus, from pro + fundus (“bottom; foundation").

    From Wiktionary