Depth meaning

dĕpth
Frequency:
A deep part or place.

The ocean depths; in the depths of the forest.

noun
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Complete detail; thoroughness.

The depth of her research; an interview conducted in great depth.

noun
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The degree of richness or intensity.

Depth of color.

noun
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Lowness in pitch.
noun
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The deep or deepest part, as of the sea.
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The distance between the front and the back, as the depth of a drawer or closet.
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(figuratively) The intensity, complexity, strength, seriousness or importance of an emotion, situation, etc.

The depth of her misery was apparent to everyone.

The depth of the crisis had been exaggerated.

We were impressed by the depth of her knowledge.

noun
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(literary, usually plural) The deepest part. (Usually of a body of water.)

The burning ship finally sunk into the depths.

noun
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(literary, usually plural) A very remote part.

Into the depths of the jungle...

In the depths of the night,

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(statistics) The lower of the two ranks of a value in an ordered set of values.
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A low point, level, or degree.

Production has fallen to new depths.

noun
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The quality or condition of being deep; deepness.
  • Intensity, as of colors, silence, or emotion.
  • Profundity of thought.
  • Lowness of pitch.
noun
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The middle part.

The depth of winter.

noun
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The far inner or inmost part.

The depths of a wood.

noun
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Reserve strength, as of suitable substitute players for a team.
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Depth refers to a numerical amount or to distance. See bit depth, color depth and depth of field.
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The vertical distance below a surface; the amount that something is deep.

Measure the depth of the water in this part of the bay.

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(computing, colors) The total palette of available colors.
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(art, photography) The property of appearing three-dimensional.

The depth of field in this picture is amazing.

noun
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The most severe part.

In the depth of the crisis.

In the depths of winter.

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Depth is defined as the distance from top down or front to back, or the intensity of color or sound.

An example of depth is a swimming pool being six feet deep.

An example of depth is the darkness of a purple dress.

noun
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The condition or quality of being deep.
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The severest or worst part.

In the depth of an economic depression.

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Intellectual complexity or penetration; profundity.

A novel of great depth.

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The range of one's understanding or competence.

I am out of my depth when it comes to cooking.

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Strength held in reserve, especially a supply of skilled or capable replacements.

A team with depth at every position.

noun
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in depth
  • In a thorough and comprehensive way.
    Analysis in depth.
idiom
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out of one's depth
  • In water too deep for one.
  • Past one's ability or understanding.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of depth

  • Middle English depthe from dep deep deep

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English depthe, from Old English *dīepþ (“depth”), from Proto-Germanic *diupiþō (“depth”), equivalent to deep +‎ -th. Cognate with Scots deepth (“depth”), West Frisian djipte (“depth”), Dutch diepte (“depth”), Middle Low German dēpede (“depth”), Danish dybde (“depth”), Icelandic dýpt (“depth”), Gothic (diupiþa, “depth”).

    From Wiktionary