Let meaning

lĕt
To give permission or opportunity to; allow.

I let them borrow the car. The inheritance let us finally buy a house.

verb
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To award, especially after bids have been submitted.

Let the construction job to a new firm.

verb
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To allow; permit.
verb
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To cause to; make.

Let me hear from you.

verb
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To allow or cause to escape; cause to flow or come out, as by shedding, emitting, etc.

To let blood.

verb
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To release from or as if from confinement.

Let the air out of the balloon; let out a yelp.

verb
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Let is defined as to allow, to give the use of or leave someone or something.

An example of let is someone permitting another to use their car.

An example of let is to rent out a room in your home.

verb
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To permit to enter, proceed, or depart.

Let the dog in.

verb
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To be or become assigned, as to a contractor.
verb
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Something that hinders; an obstacle.

Free to investigate without let or hindrance.

noun
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(sports) An invalid stroke in tennis and other net games that requires a replay.
noun
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To hinder or obstruct.
verb
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Small one.

Craterlet.

suffix
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Something worn on.

Armlet.

suffix
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To leave; forsake; abandon.
verb
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To allow to pass, come, or go.

Let me in.

verb
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To be rented or leased.

House to let.

verb
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(archaic) To hinder; obstruct; prevent.
verb
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An obstacle or impediment.
noun
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(tennis, etc.) A serve which does not count, specif. one that lands in the correct segment of the opposing player's side of the court after hitting the net.
noun
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Small.

Piglet, starlet.

affix
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A small object worn as a band on (a specified part of the body)

Armlet.

affix
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To consent to or allow.
verb
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To rent or lease (something).
verb
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To allow to, not to prevent (+ infinitive, but usually without to).

After he knocked for hours, I decided to let him come in.

verb
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To leave.

Let me alone!

verb
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To allow the release of (a fluid).

The physicians let about a pint of his blood, but to no avail.

verb
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To allow possession of (a property etc.) in exchange for rent.

I decided to let the farmhouse to a couple while I was working abroad.

verb
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To give, grant, or assign, as a work, privilege, or contract; often with out.

To let the building of a bridge.

To let out the lathing and the plastering.

verb
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Used to introduce an imperative in the first or third person.

Let's put on a show!

Let us have a moment of silence.

Let me just give you the phone number.

Let P be the point where AB and OX intersect.

verb
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1818, John Keats, "To"”".

Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, / Long hours have to and fro let creep the sand [...].

verb
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Can you let me know what time you'll be arriving?
verb
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(archaic) To hinder, prevent; to obstruct (someone or something).
verb
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noun
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(tennis) The hindrance caused by the net during serve, only if the ball falls legally.
noun
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To cause to; make.

Let the news be known.

verb
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To rent or lease.

Let rooms.

verb
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To become rented or leased.
verb
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let alone
  • Not to mention; much less:
idiom
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let go
  • To cease to employ; dismiss:
    Had to let 20 workers go.
idiom
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(informal) let off on
  • To cause to diminish, as in pressure; ease up on:
    Let off on the gas so that we do not exceed the speed limit.
idiom
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let (one's) hair down
  • To drop one's reserve or inhibitions.
idiom
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(informal) let (someone) have it
  • To beat, strike, or shoot at someone.
  • To scold or punish.
idiom
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let (someone) in on
  • To reveal (a secret) to someone:
    They finally let me in on their plans.
  • To allow someone to participate in (something).
idiom
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let up on
  • To be or become more lenient with:
    Why don't you let up on the poor child?.
idiom
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let alone
  • see let above & see the phrase under alone
idiom
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let down
  • to lower
  • to slow up; relax; slacken
  • to disappoint or fail
idiom
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let off
  • to give forth (steam, etc.)
  • to excuse from work for a short time
  • to deal leniently with; release with light punishment or none
idiom
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(informal) let on
  • to indicate one's awareness of a fact
  • to pretend
idiom
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let out
  • to allow to flow, run, etc. away; release
  • to give forth; emit
  • to lease or rent out
  • to reveal (a secret, etc.)
  • to make a garment larger by reducing (the seams, hem, etc.)
  • to cut (fur pelts) into strips that are then sewn together to achieve suppleness, attractive shading, etc.
  • to dismiss or release (attendees, detainees, etc.)
    School lets out at 3:00 p.m.
idiom
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let someone have it
  • to attack, hit, shoot, strongly rebuke, etc. someone
idiom
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let up
  • to slacken; relax
  • to cease
idiom
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let up on
  • to stop dealing harshly or severely with
idiom
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let well enough alone
  • see the phrase under alone
idiom
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0

Origin of let

  • ME < MFr -el (< L -ellus) + -et, both dim. suffixes

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Middle English lette from letten to hinder from Old English lettan lē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French -elet diminutive suff. -el (from Latin -ellus) -et -et

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English leten from Old English lǣtan lē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English leten, læten, from Old English lÇ£tan (“to allow, let go, bequeath, leave, rent"), from Proto-Germanic *lÄ“tanÄ… (“to leave behind, allow"), from Proto-Indo-European *lÄ“d- (“to let, leave behind"). Cognate with Scots lat, lete (“to let, leave"), North Frisian lete (“to let"), West Frisian litte (“to let"), Dutch laten (“to let, leave"), German lassen (“to let, leave, allow"), Swedish lÃ¥ta (“to let, allow, leave"), Icelandic láta (“to let"), Albanian lë (“to allow, let, leave").

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English letten (“to hinder, delay"), from Old English lettan (“to hinder, delay"; literally, "to make late"), from Proto-Germanic *latjanÄ…. Akin to Old English latian (“to delay"), Dutch letten, Old English læt (“late"). More at late, delay.

    From Wiktionary