Old meaning

ōld
The definition of old is advanced in age or having been around for awhile.

An example of old is the age of 120.

An example of old is milk that is past its expiration date.

adjective
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1
Having lived or existed for a specified length of time.

She was 12 years old.

adjective
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2
Old is used to mean people advanced in age collectively or days past.

An example of old is a group of elderly people in a senior citizens home.

An example of old is a Christmas memory from the 1950's.

noun
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1
Made long ago; in existence for many years.

An old book.

adjective
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An individual of a specified age.

A five-year-old.

noun
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Old people considered as a group. Used with the .

Caring for the old.

noun
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Having lived or been in existence for a long time; aged.
adjective
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Of, like, or characteristic of aged people; specif., mature in judgment, wise, etc.
adjective
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Belonging to the remote past; having existed long ago; ancient.

An old civilization.

adjective
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Former times; yore.

In days of old.

noun
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Of a certain or specified age or duration.

A child ten years old.

adjective
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Made or produced some time ago; not new.
adjective
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Familiar or known from the past; accustomed.

Up to his old tricks.

adjective
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Designating the form of a language in its earliest attested stage.

Old English.

adjective
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Having been in use for a long time; worn out by age or use; shabby.
adjective
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That was at one time; former.

My old teacher.

adjective
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Having had long experience or practice.

An old hand at this work.

adjective
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Dating or continuing from some period long before the present; of long standing.

An old tradition.

adjective
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Designating the earlier or earliest of two or more.

The Old World.

adjective
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Dear.

Old boy.

adjective
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Tiresome, annoying, etc., esp. as a result of repetition or monotony.

Their incessant chatter has gotten old.

adjective
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Having reached the stage of greatly decreased activity or showing extensive reduction of topographical form.
adjective
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Time long past; yore.

Days of old.

noun
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A person of a specified age.

A six-year-old.

noun
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Something old.
noun
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Old people.
noun
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Of an object, concept, relationship, etc., having existed for a relatively long period of time.
  • Of a living being, having lived for most of the expected years.
    A wrinkled old man.
  • Of a perishable item, having existed for most, or more than its shelf life.
    An old loaf of bread.

An old abandoned building; an old friend.

adjective
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Of an item that has been used and so is not new (unused).

I find that an old toothbrush is good to clean the keyboard with.

adjective
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Having existed or lived for the specified time.

How old are they? She's five years old and he's seven. We also have a young teen and a two-year-old.

My great-grandfather lived to be a hundred and one years old.

adjective
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Of an earlier time.
  • My new car is not as good as my old one.
    A school reunion for Old Etonians.
  • That is no longer in existence.
    The footpath follows the route of an old railway line.
  • When he got drunk and quarrelsome they just gave him the old heave-ho.
adjective
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Your constant pestering is getting old.

adjective
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Said of subdued colors, particularly reds, pinks and oranges, as if they had faded over time.
adjective
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A grammatical intensifier, often used in describing something positive. (Mostly in idioms like good old, big old and little old, any old and some old.)

We're having a good old time.

My next car will be a big old SUV.

My wife makes the best little old apple pie in Texas.

adjective
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People who are old; old beings; the older generation; usually used with the.

A civilised society should always look after the old in the community.

noun
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Eye dialect spelling of hold.
verb
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Origin of old

  • Middle English from Old English eald al-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English old, ald, from Old English ald, eald (“old, aged, ancient, antique, primeval"), from Proto-Germanic *aldaz (“grown-up"), originally a participle form from Proto-Indo-European *altós (“grown, tall, big"). Cognate with Scots auld (“old"), North Frisian ool, ual, uul (“old"), Saterland Frisian oold (“old"), West Frisian âld (“old"), Dutch oud (“old"), Low German old (“old"), German alt (“old"), Swedish äldre (“older, elder"), Icelandic eldri (“older, elder"), Latin altus (“high, tall, grown big, lofty"). Related to eld.

    From Wiktionary

  • A representation of the pronunciation of hold by a speaker whose dialect lacks the voiceless glottal fricative or transition (IPA: [h]).

    From Wiktionary