Modern meaning

mŏd'ərn
The definition of modern is having to do with the current time.

An example of modern used as an adjective is a modern oven that has current features and technology.

adjective
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Modern is defined as a style of art, design, or fashion that is very different from past styles.

An example of modern used as an adjective is the modern home design of a concrete home.

adjective
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Of or relating to the period of history after the Middle Ages, from c. a.d. 1450 to the present day.
adjective
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Current. The latest. Typically refers to the most recent model of hardware or version of software.
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Pertaining to a current or recent time and style; not ancient.

Our online interactive game is a modern approach to teaching about gum disease.

Although it was built in the 1600s, the building still has a very modern look.

adjective
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Someone who lives in modern times.
noun
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One who lives in modern times.
noun
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Designating the form of a language in its most recent stage of development.
adjective
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Of, relating to, or being a living language or group of languages.

Modern Italian; Modern Romance languages.

adjective
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One who has modern ideas, standards, or beliefs.
noun
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Any of a variety of typefaces characterized by strongly contrasted heavy and thin parts.
noun
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Of the present or recent times.
  • Of or having to do with the latest styles, methods, or ideas; up-to-date.
  • Designating or of certain contemporary trends and schools of art, music, literature, dance, etc.
  • Designating or of any of various 20th-cent. styles of modernist art, furniture, architecture, etc.
adjective
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A person living in modern times.
noun
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A person having modern ideas, beliefs, standards, etc.
noun
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A style of typeface characterized by heavy down strokes contrasting with narrow cross strokes.
noun
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Origin of modern

  • French moderne from Old French from Late Latin modernus from Latin modo in a certain manner, just now from modō ablative of modus manner med- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle French moderne, from Late Latin modernus; from Latin modo (“just now"), originally ablative of modus (“measure"); hence, by measure, "just now". See also mode.
    From Wiktionary