Fast meaning

făst
Fast means to eat little or no food.

An example of fast is not eating for twelve hours before having blood drawn.

verb
10
2
Firm in loyalty.

Fast friends.

adjective
6
0
The definition of fast is someone or something that moves quickly, is not easily moved or is firmly shut.

An example of fast is the cheetah's running speed.

An example of fast is a door that is stuck closed.

adjective
5
1
Lasting; permanent.

Fast rules and regulations.

adjective
4
0
Fast is defined as swift or ahead of time.

An example of fast is someone driving 50 in a 30 mph zone.

An example of fast is a printer getting a project completed a day early.

adverb
4
2
Advertisement
In a secure manner; tightly.

Hold fast.

adverb
2
0
Deep; sound.

In a fast sleep.

adjective
2
1
(colloquial) Having an extravagant lifestyle or immoral habits. [from 18th c.]

She's fast – she slept with him on their first date..

adjective
1
0
Acting, moving, or capable of acting or moving quickly; swift.
adjective
0
0
Indicating a time somewhat ahead of the actual time.

The clock is fast.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Allowing rapid movement or action.

A fast running track.

adjective
0
0
Designed for or compatible with a short exposure time.

Fast film.

adjective
0
0
Firmly fixed or fastened.

A fast grip.

adjective
0
0
Fixed firmly in place; secure.

Shutters that are fast against the rain.

adjective
0
0
To a sound degree; deeply.

Fast asleep.

adverb
0
0
Advertisement
In a rapid manner; quickly.
adverb
0
0
In quick succession.

New ideas followed fast.

adverb
0
0
Ahead of the correct or expected time.

A watch that runs fast.

adverb
0
0
In a dissipated, immoderate way.

Living fast.

adverb
0
0
(archaic) Close by; near.
adverb
0
0
Advertisement
To abstain from food.
verb
0
0
To eat very little or abstain from certain foods, especially as a religious discipline.
verb
0
0
The act or practice of abstaining from or eating very little food.
noun
0
0
A period of such abstention or self-denial.
noun
0
0
Not easily moved, freed, or separated; firm, fixed, or stuck.

The ship was fast on the rocks.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Firmly fastened or shut.

Make the shutters fast.

adjective
0
0
Loyal; devoted.

Fast friends.

adjective
0
0
That will not fade.

Fast colors.

adjective
0
0
Rapid in movement or action; swift; quick; speedy.
adjective
0
0
Permitting or facilitating swift movement.

A fast racetrack.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Taking or lasting a short time.

A fast lunch.

adjective
0
0
Showing or keeping to a time in advance of a standard or scheduled time.

His watch is fast.

adjective
0
0
(informal) Glib and deceptive.

A fast talker.

adjective
0
0
(slang) Acting, gotten, done, etc. quickly and often dishonestly.

Out for a fast buck.

adjective
0
0
(bacteriology) Resistant to dissolution or decolorization, as certain bacteria.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
(photog.) Adapted to or allowing very short exposure time.

A fast lens, fast film.

adjective
0
0
(now dial.) Complete; sound.

A fast sleep.

adjective
0
0
Firmly; fixedly.
adverb
0
0
Thoroughly; soundly.

Fast asleep.

adverb
0
0
Rapidly; swiftly; quickly; speedily.
adverb
0
0
Advertisement
Ahead of time.
adverb
0
0
In a reckless, dissipated way; wildly.
adverb
0
0
(old poet., obs.) Close; near.

Fast by the river.

adverb
0
0
(naut.) A rope for mooring.

A stern fast.

noun
0
0
To abstain from all or certain foods, as in observing a holy day.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To eat very little or nothing.
verb
0
0
The act of fasting.
noun
0
0
A day or period of fasting.
noun
0
0
To abstain from food.
verb
0
0
To eat very little or abstain from certain foods, especially as a religious discipline.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
The act or practice of abstaining from or eating very little food.
noun
0
0
A period of such abstention or self-denial.
noun
0
0
An asynchronous communications protocol used to quickly transmit files over high-quality lines. Error checking is done after the entire file has been transmitted.
0
0
A specification from the ATM Forum (July 2000) that defines the mechanisms and procedures required to support the transport of variable-length New York Seattle Terminals Front-End Processor Mainframe host datagrams, known as ATM frames, over an ATM infrastructure using SONET/SDH facilities. FAST is similar to Data Exchange Interface (DXI) and Frame User Network Interface (FUNI), which are designed for access to an ATM network over relatively low-speed plesiochronous transmission facilities. FAST, however, is designed for access and/or inter-switch trunking over very high speed SONET/SDH transmission facilities. See also ATM, ATM Forum, datagram, DXI, frame, FUNI, plesiochronous, SDH, and SONET.
0
0
(dated) Firmly or securely fixed in place; stable. [from 9th c.]

That rope is dangerously loose. Make it fast!

adjective
0
0
Firm against attack; fortified by nature or art; impregnable; strong.
adjective
0
0
(of people) Steadfast, with unwavering feeling. (Now only in set phrases like "fast friend".) [from 10th c.]
adjective
0
0
Moving with great speed, or capable of doing so; swift, rapid. [from 14th c.]

I am going to buy a fast car.

adjective
0
0
(computing, of a piece of hardware) Able to transfer data in a short period of time.
adjective
0
0
Deep or sound (of sleep); fast asleep (of people). [16th-19th c.]
adjective
0
0
(of dyes or colours) Not running or fading when subjected to detrimental conditions such as wetness or intense light; permanent. [from 17th c.]

All the washing has come out pink. That red tee-shirt was not fast.

adjective
0
0
Ahead of the correct time or schedule. [from 19th c.]

There must be something wrong with the hall clock. It is always fast.

adjective
0
0
(of photographic film) More sensitive to light than average. [from 20th c.]
adjective
0
0
In a firm or secure manner, securely; in such a way as not to be moved [from 10th c.].

Hold this rope as fast as you can.

adverb
0
0
(of sleeping) Deeply or soundly [from 13th c.].

He is fast asleep.

adverb
0
0
Immediately following in place or time; close, very near [from 13th c.].

The horsemen came fast on our heels.

adverb
0
0
Quickly, with great speed; within a short time [from 13th c.].

Do it as fast as you can.

adverb
0
0
Ahead of the correct time or schedule.

I think my watch is running fast.

adverb
0
0
(UK, rail transport) A train that calls at only some stations it passes between its origin and destination, typically just the principal stations.
noun
0
0
(archery) Short for "stand fast", a warning not to pass between the arrow and the target.
interjection
0
0
(intransitive) To abstain from food, or eat very little, especially for religious or medical reasons.

Muslims fast during Ramadan.

verb
0
0
The act or practice of abstaining from food or of eating very little food.
noun
0
0
The period of time during which one abstains from or eats very little food.
noun
0
0
A fast is defined as a period of time during which you go without food.

An example of fast is not eating during daylight hours for Ramadan.

noun
0
1
Quick to understand or learn; mentally agile.

A class for the faster students.

adjective
0
1
Resistant, as to destruction or fading.

Fast colors.

adjective
0
1
a fast one
  • an act intended to deceive; trick; ploy
    To pull a fast one on someone.
idiom
0
0
play fast and loose
  • to behave with reckless duplicity or insincerity
idiom
0
0
break one's fast
  • to eat food for the first time after fasting, or for the first time in the day
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of fast

  • Middle English from Old English fæst firm, fixed past- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English fasten from Old English fæstan past- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fast, from Old English fæst (“fast, fixed, firm, secure; constant, steadfast; stiff, heavy, dense; obstinate, bound, costive; enclosed, closed, watertight; strong, fortified”), from Proto-Germanic *fastaz, *fastijaz, *fastuz (“fast, firm, secure”), from Proto-Indo-European *pasto- (“fixed, firm, fortified, solid”). Cognate with Scots fest, fast (“fast”), Saterland Frisian fest (“fast”), West Frisian fêst (“fast”), Dutch vast (“fast”), German fest (“fast”), Danish fast (“fast”), Swedish fast (“fast”), Norwegian fast (“fast”), Icelandic fastur (“fast”), Armenian հաստ (hast, “thick”), Sanskrit पस्त्य (pastyá).

    From Wiktionary

  • The development of “rapid” from an original sense of “secure” apparently happened first in the adverb and then transferred to the adjective; compare hard in expressions like “to run hard”. The original sense of “secure, firm” is now slightly archaic, but retained in the related fasten (“make secure”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English fasten, from Old English fæstan (verb), from Proto-Germanic *fastijaną. Cognate with Dutch vasten, German fasten, Old Norse fasta, Gothic (fastan), Russian пост (post). The noun is probably from Old Norse fasta.

    From Wiktionary