Feast meaning

fēst
To entertain at a feast or banquet.
verb
9
4
Feast is defined as to participate in eating a huge meal or in celebrating a joyous occasion.

An example of to feast is to eat seven plates of food at a buffet.

verb
5
5
To experience something with gratification or delight.

Feasted on the view.

verb
4
0
Something giving great pleasure or satisfaction.

A book that is a veritable feast for the mind.

noun
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3
A periodic religious festival commemorating an event or honoring a god or saint.
noun
3
2
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(intransitive) To dwell upon (something) with delight.
verb
2
0
To give a feast for; entertain or feed sumptuously.

Feasted the guests on venison.

verb
2
1
To partake of a feast; eat heartily.
verb
2
1
A celebration or festival; esp., a periodic religious celebration, as in honor of God or a saint.
noun
1
0
A rich and elaborate meal; banquet.
noun
1
0
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Anything that gives pleasure because of its abundance or richness.
noun
1
0
To eat a rich, elaborate meal.
verb
1
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To have a special treat.
verb
1
0
To gratify or delight as with a feast.

Feast your eyes on this!

verb
1
0
A very large meal, often of a ceremonial nature.

We had a feast to celebrate the harvest.

noun
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Something delightful.

It was a feast for the eyes.

noun
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A festival; a holiday; a solemn, or more commonly, a joyous, anniversary.
noun
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(intransitive) To partake in a feast, or large meal.

I feasted on turkey and dumplings.

verb
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To hold a feast in honor of (someone).

We feasted them after the victory.

verb
1
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The definition of a feast is a huge meal, or a day in honor of a saint or other religious or spiritual figure.

An example of a feast is a buffet-style meal.

An example of a feast is February 3, the feast day of Saint Blaise.

noun
1
1
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feast (one's) eyes on
  • To be delighted or gratified by the sight of:
    We feasted our eyes on the paintings.
idiom
1
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

feast (one's) eyes on

Origin of feast

  • Middle English feste from Old French from Vulgar Latin fēsta from Latin pl. of fēstum from fēstus festive dhēs- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English feest, feste, fest, from Old French feste, from Latin festa, plural of festum (“holiday, festival, feast”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰēs- (“god, godhead, deity”); see also Ancient Greek θεός (theos, “god, goddess”). More at theo-.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English feesten, festen, from Old French fester, from Medieval Latin festāre, from the noun. See above.

    From Wiktionary