Filibuster meaning

fĭlə-bŭstər
To use a filibuster against (a legislative measure, for example).
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(US, politics) A delaying tactic, especially the use of long, often irrelevant speeches given in order to delay progress or the making of a decision, especially on the floor of the US Senate.
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(US, politics) To use obstructionist tactics in a legislative body.
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(US, politics) A member of a legislative body causing such obstruction.
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Filibusters are defined as actions, such as long speeches, that stop a legislative assembly from progressing.

When senators give very, very long speeches to try to prevent a vote on a bill they do not want, this is an example of a filibuster.

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To obstruct or delay legislative action, especially by making prolonged speeches.
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An adventurer who engages in a private military action in a foreign country.
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To take part in a private military action in a foreign country.
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To engage in unauthorized warfare as a freebooter.
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To engage in a filibuster.
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To obstruct the passage of (a bill) by a filibuster.
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An adventurer who engages in unauthorized warfare against a country with which his own country is at peace; specif., any of the 19th-cent. U.S. adventurers who led armed expeditions into Latin American countries; freebooter.
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A freebooter, or mercenary soldier.

1890 These duties involved prodigious physical and mental exertion, in a climate deadly to Europeans. They also involved much voyaging in waters haunted by filibusters and buccaneers. But nothing appears to daunt Labat. As for the filibusters, he becomes their comrade and personal friend; – he even becomes their chaplain, and does not scruple to make excursions with them. — Lafcadio Hearn, Two Years in the French West Indies.

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To take part in a private military action in a foreign country.
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Origin of filibuster

  • From Spanish filibustero freebooter from French flibustier from Dutch vrijbuiter pirate freebooter

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Spanish filibustero (“pirate”), from French flibustier, from Dutch vrijbuiter (“freebooter”), from vrij (“free”) + buit (“booty”) + -er (“agent”). Same construction and cognate to English freebooter.

    From Wiktionary