Foreign meaning

fôrĭn, fŏr-
Situated outside one's own country, province, locality, etc.

Foreign lands.

adjective
35
16

There are many more foreign students in Europe since the Erasmus scheme started.

adjective
24
13
Not natural; alien.

Jealousy is foreign to her nature.

adjective
18
17
Situated in an abnormal or improper place in the body and typically introduced from outside.

A foreign object in the eye.

adjective
13
5
Of, from, or characteristic of another country or countries.

Foreign languages.

adjective
9
13
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Relating to another country or jurisdiction.
adjective
6
3
Of an object, etc, in a place where it does not belong.

Foreign body.

adjective
5
2
Belonging to a different organization, company etc.

My bank charges me $2.50 every time I use a foreign ATM.

adjective
5
3
The definition of foreign is from a country other than your own.

An example of a foreign language is Spanish, if you live in the U.S.

An example of a foreign country is Spain, if you live in the U.S.

adjective
5
7
Situated in an abnormal or improper place in the body and typically introduced from outside.

A foreign object in the eye.

adjective
4
3
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Having to do with the relations of one country to another country or countries.

Foreign affairs, foreign trade.

adjective
4
3

Eating with chopsticks was a foreign concept to him.

adjective
4
3
Subject to the jurisdiction of another political unit.
adjective
3
3
Not subject to the laws or jurisdiction of the specified country.
adjective
3
3
Subject to the jurisdiction of another political unit.
adjective
3
3
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Not germane; irrelevant.
adjective
3
5
Not organically belonging; introduced from outside.
adjective
2
2
(US, state law) From a different one of the states of the United States, as of a state of residence or incorporation.
adjective
2
2
(informal) Foreigner.
noun
2
2

Origin of foreign

  • Middle English forein from Old French forain from Late Latin forānus on the outside from Latin forās outside dhwer- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English forein, from Old French forain, from Vulgar Latin *forānus, from Latin forās (“outside, outdoors”), also spelled forīs (“outside, outdoors”). Displaced native Middle English elendish, ellendish (“foreign”) (from Old English elelendisc, compare Old English ellende (“foreign”), elland (“foreign land”)), Middle English eltheodi, eltheodish (“foreign”) (from Old English elþēodiġ, elþēodisc (“foreign”)), and non-native Middle English peregrin (“foreign”) (from Old French peregrin).

    From Wiktionary