Canter meaning

kăntər
The definition of a canter is the pace of a horse that is moving at a speed between a trot and a gallop.

When a horse is moving along a meadow, going a little bit faster than trotting but not quite running, the pace at which the horse is moving is an example of a canter.

noun
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To canter is to ride a horse that is moving at a pace in between a trot and a gallop.

When you move along riding on a horse going at mid-speed, a bit faster than trotting, this is an example of a time when you canter the horse.

verb
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A ride on a horse moving with this gait.
noun
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To go or move at a canter.
verb
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To cause (a horse) to go at a canter.
verb
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A smooth, easy pace like a moderate gallop.
noun
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The rumbling sound of a cantering horse.
noun
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To ride or move at a canter.
verb
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A gait of a horse between a trot and a gallop, consisting of three beats and a "suspension" phase, where there are no feet on the ground. Also describing this gait on other four legged animals.
noun
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A ride on a horse at such speed.
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(intransitive) To move at such pace.
verb
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(intransitive) To cause to move at a canter; to ride (a horse) at a canter.
verb
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One who cants or whines; a beggar.
noun
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One who makes hypocritical pretensions to goodness; one who uses canting language.
noun
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A smooth three-beat gait of a horse that is slower than a gallop but faster than a trot, in which the feet touch the ground in the three-beat sequence of near hind foot, off hind foot and near front foot, off front foot.
noun
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Origin of canter

  • Ultimately from phrases such as Canterbury gallop after Canterbury England, toward which pilgrims rode at an easy pace

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Short for Canterbury pace, from the supposed easy pace of medieval pilgrims to Canterbury.

    From Wiktionary

  • cant +‎ -er

    From Wiktionary