March meaning

märch
March is defined as to walk in a steady way or to a beat, or to cause to go.

An example of march is to walk with a high school band.

An example of march is to make soldiers walk toward a battle.

verb
3
1
To participate in an organized walk, as for a public cause.
verb
2
0
To have a common boundary.

England marches with Scotland.

verb
2
0
A surname for someone born in March, or for someone living near a boundary (marche).
pronoun
2
0
To cause to move or otherwise progress in a steady rhythmical manner.

March soldiers into battle; marched us off to the dentist.

verb
1
0
Advertisement
The act of marching, especially:
  • The steady forward movement of a body of troops.
  • A long tiring journey on foot.
noun
0
0
Steady forward movement or progression.

The march of time.

noun
0
0
A regulated pace.

Quick march; slow march.

noun
0
0
The distance covered within a certain period of time by moving or progressing steadily and rhythmically.

A week's march away.

noun
0
0
A composition in regularly accented, usually duple meter that is appropriate to accompany marching.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
An organized walk or procession by a group of people for a specific cause or issue.
noun
0
0
A tract of land bordering on two countries and claimed by both.
noun
0
0
The third month of the year in the Gregorian calendar.
noun
0
0
To walk with regular, steady steps of equal length, usually in a group or military formation.
verb
0
0
To walk in a grave, stately way.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To advance or progress steadily.
verb
0
0
To cause (troops, etc.) to march.
verb
0
0
To cause or force to go.
verb
0
0
The act of marching.
noun
0
0
A regular forward movement; steady advance; progress.

The march of events.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
A regular, steady step or pace.
noun
0
0
The distance covered in a period of marching.

A day's march.

noun
0
0
A long, tiring walk.
noun
0
0
A piece of music, with a steady, even beat, suitable for marching to.
noun
0
0
An organized walk by a number of people demonstrating on some public issue.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A borderland, esp. one in dispute.
noun
0
0
To have a common border (with); border.
verb
0
0
The third month of the year, having 31 days.
noun
0
0
A formal, rhythmic way of walking, used especially by soldiers, bands and in ceremonies.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Any song in the genre of music written for marching (see Wikipedia's article on this type of music)
noun
0
0
Steady forward movement or progression.

The march of time.

noun
0
0
To walk with long, regular strides, as a soldier does.
verb
0
0
To go to war; to make military advances.
verb
0
0
(now archaic, historical) A border region, especially one originally set up to defend a boundary.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(historical) A region at a frontier governed by a marquess.
noun
0
0
The name for any of various territories with similar meanings or etymologies in their native languages.
noun
0
0
(intransitive) To have common borders or frontiers.
verb
0
0
(obsolete) Smallage.
noun
0
0
The third month of the Gregorian calendar, following February and preceding April. Abbreviation: Mar or Mar.
pronoun
0
0
Advertisement
The definition of a march is the act of moving forward at a steady pace or beat, or the third month of the year.

An example of a march is a high school band parading around the track.

An example of March is the month in which St. Patrick's Day falls.

noun
0
1
To traverse by progressing steadily and rhythmically.

They marched the route in a day.

verb
0
1
The border or boundary of a country or an area of land; a frontier.
noun
0
1
on the march
  • Advancing steadily; progressing:.
    Technology is on the march.
idiom
0
0
steal a march on
  • To get ahead of, especially by quiet enterprise.
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
on the march
  • Marching or advancing.
idiom
0
0
steal a march on
  • To get an advantage over without being perceived.
idiom
0
0
the Marches
  • Borderlands between England & Scotland and between England & Wales.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

on the march
steal a march on
on the march
steal a march on
the Marches

Origin of march

  • Middle English marchen from Old French marchier from Frankish markōn to mark out merg- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman from Latin Mārtius (mēnsis) (month) of Mars from Mārs Mārt- Mars
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old French marche of Germanic origin merg- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English marchen from Middle French marcher (“to march, to walk"), from Old French marchier (“to stride, to march, to trample"), from Frankish *markōn (“to mark, mark out, to press with the foot"), from Proto-Germanic *markō, akin to Persian مرز (marz), from Proto-Indo-European *mereg- (“edge, boundary"). Akin to Old English mearc, Ä¡emearc "mark, boundary".
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English marche (“tract of land along a country's border"), from Old French marche (“boundary, frontier"), from Frankish *marka, from Proto-Germanic *markō, from Proto-Indo-European *mereg- (“edge, boundary").
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English March(e), from Anglo-Norman Marche, from Old French marz, from Latin mārtius, from earlier Mavors.
    From Wiktionary