Fluke meaning

flo͝ok
The definition of a fluke is an odd occurrence that happens and is unlikely to be repeated.

An example of a fluke is a snowstorm in July.

noun
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Any of numerous parasitic flatworms, including the trematodes, some of which infect humans, and the monogeneans, which are chiefly ectoparasites of fish.
noun
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Any of various flatfishes chiefly of the genus Paralichthys, especially the summer flounder.
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The triangular blade at the end of an arm of an anchor, designed to catch in the ground.
noun
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A barb or barbed head, as on an arrow or a harpoon.
noun
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Either of the two horizontally flattened divisions of the tail of a whale.
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A chance occurrence.

That spring snowstorm was a total fluke.

noun
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An accidentally good or successful stroke in billiards or pool.
noun
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Any of various flatfishes, esp. a genus (Paralichthys) of flounders.
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A pointed part of an anchor, designed to catch in the ground.
noun
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A barb or barbed head of an arrow, harpoon, etc.
noun
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Either of the two lobes of a whale's tail.
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An accidentally good or lucky stroke in billiards, pool, etc.
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A result, esp. a successful one, brought about by accident; stroke of luck.
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To hit or get by a fluke.
verb
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Any of numerous parasitic flatworms, including the trematodes, some of which infect humans, and the monogeneans, which are chiefly ectoparasites of fish.
noun
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Either of the two flattened fins of a whale's tail.
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A surname​.
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Origin of fluke

  • Middle English flounder, flatfish from Old English flōc plāk-1 in Indo-European roots Sense 1, from the flounderlike shape of sheep flukes
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Possibly from fluke
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Origin unknown
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition