Flounder meaning

floundər
Any of various marine flatfishes chiefly of the families Bothidae and Pleuronectidae, including several important food fishes.
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The definition of a flounder is a type of flatfish.

An example of flounder is halibut or turbot served at seafood restaurants.

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To struggle awkwardly to move, as in deep mud or snow; plunge about in a stumbling manner.
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To speak or act in an awkward, confused manner, with hesitation and frequent mistakes.
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Any of two families (Bothidae and Pleuronectidae) of flatfishes, including halibut, plaice, and turbot.
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Flounder is defined as to stumble or struggle to talk, make a lot of errors, or move in a clumsy way.

An example of flounder is to have trouble speaking without hesitation or losing your train of thought.

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A European species of flatfish having dull brown colouring with reddish-brown blotches; fluke, European flounder, Platichthys flesus.
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(North America) Any of various flatfish of the family Pleuronectidae or Bothidae.
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(intransitive) To flop around as a fish out of water.
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(intransitive) To make clumsy attempts to move or regain one's balance.

Robert yanked Connie's leg vigorously, causing her to flounder and eventually fall.

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(intransitive) To act clumsily or confused; to struggle or be flustered.
  • 1996, Janette Turner Hospital, Oyster, Virago Press, paperback edition, page 136
    He is assessing directions, but he is not lost, not floundering.

He gave a good speech, but floundered when audience members asked questions he could not answer well.

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To move clumsily or with little progress, as through water or mud.
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To act or function in a confused or directionless manner; struggle.
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The act of floundering.
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The act of floundering.
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Origin of flounder

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman floundre of Scandinavian origin plat- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably alteration of founder

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Possibly from the noun. Possibly from founder or from Dutch flodderen (“wade”). See other terms beginning with fl, such as flutter, flitter, float, flap, flub, flip

    From Wiktionary

  • From Anglo-Norman floundre, from Old Northern French flondre, from Old Norse flyðra. Cognate with Danish flynder, German Flunder, Swedish flundra.

    From Wiktionary