Diagonal meaning

dī-ăgə-nəl
Frequency:
A diagonal line or plane.
noun
8
6
Pertaining to the front left and back right (the front right and back left) legs of a quadruped.
adjective
7
2
The definition of diagonal is something with slanted lines or a line that connects one corner with the corner furthest away.

An example of diagonal is a line going from the bottom left corner of a square to the top right corner.

adjective
6
5
Having oblique lines or markings.
adjective
4
5
(geometry) A diagonal line or plane.
noun
2
1
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A virgule.
noun
2
4
Having a slanted or oblique direction.
adjective
1
0
Any diagonal course, row, order, or part.
noun
1
0
A line or cut across a fabric that is not at right angles to a side of the fabric.
noun
1
0
Something arranged diagonally or obliquely.
noun
0
0
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A punctuation mark used to separate related items of information.
noun
0
0
(geometry) A line joining non-adjacent vertices of a polygon.
noun
0
0
Relating to or being the front left and back right feet or the front right and back left feet of a quadruped.
adjective
0
1
Something, such as a row, course, or part, that is arranged obliquely.
noun
0
1
A fabric woven with diagonal lines.
noun
0
1
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Extending between the vertices of any two nonadjacent angles in a polygonal figure or between any two vertices not in the same face in a polyhedral figure.
adjective
0
1
Moving or extending obliquely, esp. at a 45° angle; slanting.
adjective
0
1
Having slanting markings, lines, etc.
adjective
0
1
Cloth woven with diagonal lines; twill.
noun
0
1
Connecting two nonadjacent corners in a polygon or two nonadjacent corners in a polyhedron that do not lie in the same face.
adjective
0
1
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A diagonal line segment.
noun
0
1
(geometry) Joining two nonadjacent vertices (of a polygon or polyhedron).
adjective
0
1
adjective
0
1

Origin of diagonal

  • Latin diagōnālis from Greek diagōnios from angle to angle dia- dia- gōniā angle, corner genu-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French diagonal, from Latin diagōnālis, from Ancient Greek διαγώνιος (diagonios, “from angle to angle”), from διά (dia, “across”) + γωνία (gonia, “angle”).

    From Wiktionary