Chip meaning

chĭp
Chip is defined as to break off a small piece or cut into small pieces.

An example of chip is for a piece of china to break off of a china bowl.

verb
1
0
The definition of a chip is a thin piece of something broken off, or a place where something has been broken off, or slice or small piece of food.

An example of a chip is a small missing piece of tooth.

An example of a chip is a tiny piece of chocolate that goes in cookies.

noun
0
0
A small broken or cut off piece, as of wood, stone, or glass.
noun
0
0
A crack or flaw caused by the removal of a small piece.
noun
0
0
A small, thin piece of semiconductor bearing numerous circuits integrated into its substrate. A chip smaller than a fingernail can hold millions of circuits. Most of a computer's circuitry is built from chips mounted on circuit boards.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Wood, palm leaves, straw, or similar material cut and dried for weaving.
noun
0
0
A fragment of dried animal dung used as fuel.
noun
0
0
Something worthless.
noun
0
0
A chip shot.
noun
0
0
To chop or cut with an ax or other implement.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To shape or carve by cutting or chopping.

Chipped her name in the stone.

verb
0
0
To become broken off into small pieces.
verb
0
0
To make a chip shot in golf.
verb
0
0
To cheep, as a bird.
verb
0
0
A trick method of throwing one's opponent in wrestling.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To cut or chop with an ax or other sharp tool.
verb
0
0
To shape by cutting or chopping.

To chip a hole in the ice.

verb
0
0
To hit (a ball) in a short, soft shot with backspin.
verb
0
0
To make a chip shot.
verb
0
0
To hit a short, soft shot with backspin.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
A small, thin piece of wood, stone, etc., cut or broken off.
noun
0
0
A place where a small piece has been chipped off.

A chip on the edge of a plate.

noun
0
0
Wood, palm leaf, or straw split and woven into bonnets, hats, etc.
noun
0
0
A fragment of dried animal dung, sometimes used for fuel.
noun
0
0
A worthless thing.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
One of the small, round disks or counters used in poker and other gambling games as a token for money.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
A shot that is chipped.
noun
0
0
(1) A bit in a spreading signal. See chip rate.
0
0
In computer hardware, a miniaturized integrated electronic circuit etched on a tiny wafer of silicon. See also electronic, hardware, integrated circuit, and silicon.
0
0
Advertisement
In spread spectrum (SS) radio, a random pseudonoise (PN) code symbol. A sequence of chips, each of which has a much shorter duration than an information bit, are used to modulate the bits. The IEEE 802.11b standard for wireless LANs (WLANs), for example specifies Barker code at transmission rates of 1 Mbps and 2 Mbps, and complementary code keying (CCK) at 5.5 Mbps and 11 Mbps. Both Barker code and CCK code data bits into chips to form symbols prior to transmission. See also Barker code, CCK, code, DSSS, FHSS, SS, and symbol.
0
0
A diminutive of the male given names Christopher and Charles.
pronoun
0
0
chip off the old block
  • A child whose appearance or character closely resembles that of one or the other parent.
idiom
0
0
chip on (one's) shoulder
  • A habitually hostile or combative attitude.
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
when the chips are down
  • At a critical or difficult time.
idiom
0
0
cash in one's chips
  • To turn in one's chips for their equivalent in money.
  • To die.
idiom
0
0
chip away (at)
  • To accomplish or deal with (something) a little at a time.
    To chip away at a long-term project.
  • To gradually reduce or lessen (something).
    Competitors chipped away at our annual profits.
idiom
0
0
chip in
  • To share in giving money or help.
  • To add one's comments.
idiom
0
0
chip off the old block
  • One who is much like one's parent in appearance or characteristics.
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
chip on one's shoulder
  • An inclination to fight or quarrel.
idiom
0
0
in the chips
  • Rich; wealthy.
idiom
0
0
let the chips fall where they may
  • Let the consequences be what they may.
idiom
0
0
when the chips are down
  • When something is really at stake.
idiom
0
0

Origin of chip

  • Middle English from Old English cyp beam from Latin cippus

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Imitative

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition