Flake meaning

flāk
(slang) An eccentric, unbalanced, or irrational person.
noun
18
2
(slang) A somewhat eccentric person; an oddball.
noun
10
1
A flat thin piece or layer; a chip.
noun
3
1
(archaeology) A stone fragment removed from a core or from another flake by percussion or pressure, serving as a preform or as a tool or blade itself.
noun
3
1
A small, symmetrical, six-sided crystal of snow. Flakes can be large or small and wet or dry, depending on weather conditions. They are white in color because of their large number of reflecting surfaces.
2
0
Advertisement
To cover, mark, or overlay with or as if with flakes.
verb
2
1
A small piece; a bit.
noun
1
0
A frame or platform for drying fish or produce.
noun
1
0
(slang) Cocaine.
noun
1
1
To remove a flake or flakes from; chip.
verb
1
1
Advertisement
verb
1
1
Flake is defined as to peel or chip off.

An example of flake is splitting wood into chips.

verb
0
0
The definition of a flake is a small piece of something, or is slang for an unreliable person.

An example of a flake is a sliver of chocolate.

An example of a flake is a person who does not show up to complete his volunteer activities.

noun
0
0
To form into flakes.
verb
0
0
To chip or peel off in flakes.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To make or become spotted with flakes.
verb
0
0
A platform or rack for storing or drying food.
noun
0
0
A relatively thin, sharp-edged stone fragment removed from a core or from another flake by striking or prying, serving as a tool or blade itself or as a blank for making other tools.
0
0
A loose filmy mass or a thin chiplike layer of anything; a film; flock; lamina; layer; scale; as, a flake of snow, paint, or fish.

There were a few flakes of paint on the floor from when we were painting the walls.

Flakes of dandruff.

noun
0
0
(archaeology) A prehistoric tool chipped out of stone.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(informal) A person who is impractical, flighty, unreliable, or inconsistent; especially with maintaining a living.

She makes pleasant conversation, but she's kind of a flake when it comes time for action.

noun
0
0
A carnation with only two colours in the flower, the petals having large stripes.
noun
0
0
To break or chip off in a flake.

The paint flaked off after only a year.

verb
0
0
(colloquial) To prove unreliable or impractical; to abandon or desert, to fail to follow through.

He said he'd come and help, but he flaked.

verb
0
0
(technical) To store an item such as rope in layers.

The line is flaked into the container for easy attachment and deployment.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
(Ireland, slang) To hit (another person).
verb
0
0
(UK) Dogfish.
noun
0
0
(Australia) The meat of the gummy shark.
noun
0
0
(UK, dialect) A paling; a hurdle.
noun
0
0
A platform of hurdles, or small sticks made fast or interwoven, supported by stanchions, for drying codfish and other things.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(nautical) A small stage hung over a vessel's side, for workmen to stand on while calking, etc.
noun
0
0
A small crystalline bit of snow.
noun
0
1
To come off in flat thin pieces or layers.
verb
0
1
A scaffold lowered over the side of a ship to support workers or caulkers.
noun
0
1
A small, thin mass.

A flake of snow.

noun
0
1
Advertisement
A thin piece or layer split off or peeled off from anything; chip.
noun
0
1
(slang) flake out
  • to fall asleep
  • to faint
idiom
1
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of flake

  • Middle English fleke from Old Norse fleki hurdle, shield used for defense in battle plāk-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English plāk-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English flake (“a flake of snow”), from Old English *flacca, from Old Norse flak (“loose or torn piece”), from Proto-Germanic *flaką (“something flat”), from Proto-Indo-European *pele- (“flat, broad, plain”). Cognate with Norwegian flak (“slice, sliver”, literally “piece torn off”), Swedish flak (“a thin slice”), Danish flage (“flake”), German Flocke (“flake”), Dutch vlak (“smooth surface, plain”) and vlok (“flake”), Latin plaga (“flat surface, district, region”).

    From Wiktionary

  • A name given to dogfish to improve its marketability as a food, perhaps from etymology 1.

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare Icelandic flaki?, fleki?, Danish flage, Dutch vlaak.

    From Wiktionary