Sliver meaning

slĭvər
A slender piece cut, split, or broken off; a splinter.

Slivers of broken glass.

noun
2
0
A continuous strand of loose fiber, such as wool, flax, silk, or cotton, ready to be roved or spun.
noun
1
0
A small narrow piece, portion, or plot.

A sliver of land.

noun
0
0
To split or become split into slivers.
verb
0
0
A thin, sharp piece that has been cut, split, or broken off something; splinter.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Any slender fragment or portion.

The cresecent moon was a sliver of light.

noun
0
0
A loose, thin, continuous fiber or strand, as of wool or flax after carding, ready to be drawn and twisted.
noun
0
0
To cut or break into slivers.
verb
0
0
A long piece cut or rent off; a sharp, slender fragment; a splinter.
noun
0
0
A strand, or slender roll, of cotton or other fiber in a loose, untwisted state, produced by a carding machine and ready for the roving or slubbing which precedes spinning.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Bait made of pieces of small fish. Compare kibblings.
noun
0
0
(US, New York) A narrow high-rise apartment building.
noun
0
0
To cut or divide into long, thin pieces, or into very small pieces; to cut or rend lengthwise; to slit.

To sliver wood.

verb
0
0

Origin of sliver

  • Middle English slivere from sliven to split from Old English slīfan

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English slivere, sliver from Middle English sliven (“to cut, cleave, split"), from Old English -slÄ«fan (as in tōslÄ«fan (“to split, split up")).

    From Wiktionary