Ding meaning

dĭng
To cause to clang, as by striking.
verb
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To speak persistently and repetitiously.
verb
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To make a sound like that of a bell; ring.
verb
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To ring; clang.
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A ringing sound.
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A small dent or nick, as in the body of a car.
noun
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To dent or nick.
verb
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To hit or strike.

Was dinged on the head by a ball.

verb
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To shoot, especially with a gun.
verb
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To strike; hit.
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To make ring.
verb
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To repeat insistently or tiresomely; din.
verb
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The sound of a bell.
noun
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A small dent.
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(informal) Very minor damage, a small dent or chip.
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(colloquial) A rejection.
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(colloquial) To fire or reject.

His top school dinged him last week.

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(colloquial) To deduct, as points, from another, in the manner of a penalty.

My bank dinged me three bucks for using their competitor's ATM.

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(golf) To mishit (a golf ball).
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A high-pitched sound of a bell, especially with wearisome continuance.
noun
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(intransitive) To make high-pitched sound like a bell.
verb
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To keep repeating; impress by reiteration, with reference to the monotonous striking of a bell.
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(intransitive, colloquial, gaming) To level up.
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Ancient Chinese vessel with legs and a lid; also called ting.
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To instill with constant repetition.

Dinged advice into my head.

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Origin of ding

  • From ding to strike, beat on, pound (from Middle English dingen) (Old Norse dengja) and from ding

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Partly imitative and partly alteration of din

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English dingen, dyngen (strong verb), perhaps from the merger of Old English dengan (“ to ding, beat, strike”, weak verb) and Old Norse dengja (“to hammer”, weak verb); both from Proto-Germanic *dangijaną (“to beat, hammer, peen”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰen- (“to beat, push”). Cognate with Icelandic dengja (“to hammer”), Swedish dänga (“to bang, beat”), Danish dænge (“to bang, beat”), German tengeln, dengeln (“to peen”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Romanized from Mandarin (dǐng)

    From Wiktionary

  • Onomatopoeic. Compare ding-dong,

    From Wiktionary