Pound definition

pound
A unit of weight differing in various countries and times.
noun
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To instill by persistent, emphatic repetition.

Pounded knowledge into the students' heads.

verb
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To produce energetically, as from forceful use of the hands. Often used with out .
verb
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An enclosure for keeping or sheltering animals.
noun
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The pound key on a telephone.
noun
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To cause harm or loss to; affect adversely.

Stocks that were pounded when energy prices rose.

verb
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To strike repeatedly and forcefully, especially with the hand or a tool.

Pounded the nail with a hammer.

verb
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(archaic) To confine in a pound.
verb
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A primary unit of currency in Scotland before the Act of Union (1707).
noun
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To assault with military force.

Pounded the bunker with mortars.

verb
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Pound is defined as the basic unit for weight in the Foot Pound Second (F.P.S) system and is equal to 16 ounces.

An example of a pound is a man weighing 186 pounds.

An example of a pound is purchasing 3 pounds of lemons.

noun
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Pound means to repeatedly strike with force.

An example of to pound is to tenderize meat with a mallet.

verb
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The definition of a pound is the shortened version of pound sterling, the basic monetary unit in the United Kingdom.

An example of a pound is the 5 pounds it would cost to purchase a jar of orange marmalade at Harrods department store in London.

noun
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A unit of weight equal to 16 ounces (453.592 grams).
noun
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A unit of apothecary weight equal to 12 ounces (373.242 grams).
noun
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The primary unit of currency in the United Kingdom, worth 20 shillings or 240 old pence before the decimalization of 1971.
noun
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To defeat soundly.

Pounded their rivals in the season finale.

verb
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To attack verbally; criticize.

Was pounded for months in the press.

verb
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(slang) To drink quickly (a beverage, especially an alcoholic one). Often used with back or down .

Pounded back a few beers after work.

verb
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To beat to a powder or pulp; pulverize or crush.

Pound corn into meal.

verb
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To strike vigorous, repeated blows.

He pounded on the table.

verb
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To move along heavily and noisily.

The children pounded up the stairs.

verb
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To pulsate rapidly and heavily; throb.

My heart pounded.

verb
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To move or work laboriously.

A ship that pounded through heavy seas.

verb
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A heavy blow.
noun
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The sound of a heavy blow; a thump.
noun
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The act of pounding.
noun
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A public enclosure for the confinement of stray animals, especially dogs.
noun
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A place in which vehicles impounded by the authorities are held until redeemed by their owners.
noun
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(archaic) A prison.
noun
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An enclosure in which animals, especially farm animals, are kept.
noun
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A container, as on a boat, in which fish are kept.
noun
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To confine (an animal) in a pound.
verb
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The basic monetary unit of the United Kingdom, equal to 100 (new) pennies: before 1971 a pound was equal to 20 shillings or 240 pennies.
noun
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Any of the basic monetary units of various countries, as Egypt, Lebanon, and Syria.
noun
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A former Scottish monetary unit (pound Scots), originally equal to the British pound.
noun
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noun
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The basic unit of weight in the FPS system, equal to l6 ounces avoirdupois (453.59237 grams)
noun
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A unit of weight equal to 12 ounces troy or 12 ounces apothecaries' (373.2418 grams)
noun
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To beat to a pulp, powder, etc.; pulverize.
verb
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To strike or drive with repeated, heavy blows.
verb
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To make by pounding.
verb
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To force or impose.

Pound sense into him.

verb
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To deliver repeated, heavy blows (at or on a door, etc.)
verb
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To move with heavy steps or come down heavily while moving.
verb
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To beat heavily; throb.
verb
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The act of pounding.
noun
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A hard blow.
noun
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The sound of this; thud; thump.
noun
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An enclosure, maintained as by a city or county, for confining stray animals until claimed or adopted.
noun
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An enclosure for trapping animals.
noun
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A place of confinement, as for arrested persons.
noun
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An enclosed area for catching or keeping fish, esp. the inner section of a pound net.
noun
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(person) 1885-1972; U.S. poet, in Italy (1924-45; 1958-72)
proper name
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A unit of weight in the US Customary System equal to 16 ounces (0.45 kilograms).
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The currency unit of Great Britain, comprised of 100 pence. The pound is also known as the sterling. Traders write it as GBP. The Falkland Islands, Gibraler, St. Helena, and the Sudan Republic also use the pound. It is also the currency unit of Cyprus, comprised of 100 cents, and the currency unit of Egypt and Syria, comprised of 100 piasters.
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Short for pound-force, a unit of force/weight.
noun
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A unit of mass equal to 16 avoirdupois ounces (= 453.592 37 g). Today this value is the most common meaning of "pound" as a unit of weight.
noun
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A unit of mass equal to 12 troy ounces (≈ 373.242 g). Today, this is a common unit of weight when measuring precious metals, and is little used elsewhere.
noun
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(US) The symbol # (octothorpe, hash)
noun
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The unit of currency used in the United Kingdom and its dependencies. It is divided into 100 pence.
noun
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Any of various units of currency used in Cyprus, Egypt, Lebanon, and formerly in the Republic of Ireland and Israel.
noun
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Any of various units of currency formerly used in the United States.

The Rhode Island pound; the New Hampshire pound.

noun
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Plural form of pound (unit of currency)
noun
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A place for the detention of stray or wandering animals.
noun
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A place for the detention of automobiles that have been illegally parked, abandoned, etc.
noun
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The part of a canal between two locks, and therefore at the same water level.
noun
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A kind of fishing net, having a large enclosure with a narrow entrance into which fish are directed by wings spreading outward.
noun
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To confine in, or as in, a pound; to impound.

verb
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To strike hard, usually repeatedly.
verb
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To crush to pieces; to pulverize.
verb
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(slang) To eat or drink very quickly.

You really pounded that beer!

verb
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(baseball, slang) To pitch consistently to a certain location.

The pitcher has been pounding the outside corner all night.

verb
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(intransitive, of a body part, generally heart, blood, or head) To beat strongly or throb.

As I tiptoed past the sleeping dog, my heart was pounding but I remained silent.

My head was pounding.

verb
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(slang) To penetrate sexually, with vigour.

I was pounding her all night!

verb
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To advance heavily with measured steps.
verb
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(engineering) To make a jarring noise, as when running.

The engine pounds.

verb
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A hard blow.
noun
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The primary unit of currency in Ireland and Cyprus before the adoption of the euro.
noun
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1
(slang) pound the pavement
  • To travel the streets on foot, especially in search of work.
idiom
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pound out
  • to flatten, smooth, etc. by pounding
idiom
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pound the pavement
  • to walk the streets, as in looking for work
idiom
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
pound
Plural:
pounds

Origin of pound

  • Middle English from Old English pund from West Germanic punda- from Latin (lībra) pondō (a pound) by weight (s)pen- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English pund- enclosure (as in pundfall pen)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English pounden alteration of pounen from Old English pūnian

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From an alteration of earlier poun, pown, from Middle English pounen, from Old English pÅ«nian (“to pound, beat, bray, bruise, crush"), from Proto-Germanic *pÅ«nōnÄ… (“to break to pieces, pulverise"). Related to Saterland Frisian Pün (“debris, fragments"), Dutch puin (“debris, fragments, rubbish"), Low German pun (“fragments"). Perhaps influenced by Etymology 2 Middle English *pound, pond, from Old English *pund, pynd, in relation to the hollow mortar for pounding with the pestle.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Old English pund (“a pound, weight"), from Proto-Germanic *pundÄ… (“pound, weight"), an early borrowing from Latin pondō (“by weight"), ablative form of pondus (“weight"), from Proto-Indo-European *pend-, *spend- (“to pull, stretch"). Cognate with Dutch pond, German Pfund, Swedish pund.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English *pound, pond, from Old English *pund (“an inclosure"), attested by pyndan (“to enclose, shut up, dam, impound"). Compare also Old English pynd (“a cistern, lake").

    From Wiktionary