Mortar meaning

môrtər
Frequency:
To plaster or join with mortar.
verb
2
0
Any of various similar devices, for shooting lifelines, flares, etc.
noun
2
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To attack with mortar shells.
verb
2
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Mortar is a bowl or machine used for grinding, a cannon or other shooting device or a mixture used in building for binding materials together.

An example of mortar is a stone bowl that you would use with a pestle to grind seeds into a powder.

An example of a mortar is a weapon that fires explosives.

An example of mortar is what a stone mason would use when building a rock wall.

noun
1
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A vessel in which substances are crushed or ground with a pestle.
noun
1
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A machine in which materials are ground and blended or crushed.
noun
1
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Any of various bonding materials used in masonry, surfacing, and plastering, especially a mixture of cement or lime, sand, and water that hardens in place and is used to bind together bricks or stones.
noun
1
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To bombard with mortar shells.
verb
1
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A very hard bowl in which softer substances are ground or pounded to a powder with a pestle.
noun
1
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Any machine in which materials are ground or pounded.
noun
1
0
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A short-barreled cannon with a low muzzle velocity, which hurls shells in a high trajectory.
noun
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A mixture of cement or lime with sand and water, used between bricks or stones to bind them together in building, or as plaster.
noun
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To plaster or bind together with mortar.
verb
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(uncountable) A mixture of lime or cement, sand and water used for bonding bricks and stones.
noun
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(countable, military) A muzzle-loading, indirect fire weapon with a tube length of 10 to 20 calibers and designed to lob shells at very steep trajectories.
noun
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(countable) A hollow vessel used to pound, crush, rub, grind or mix ingredients with a pestle.
noun
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To use mortar or plaster to join two things together.
verb
0
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To fire a mortar (weapon)
verb
0
0

Origin of mortar

  • Middle English morter from Old English mortere and from Old French mortier both from Latin mortārium mer- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French mortier, from Latin mortarium.

    From Wiktionary