Reject meaning

rĭ-jĕkt
To refuse to take, agree to, accede to, use, believe, etc.
verb
5
3
To pass over or skip from (a record set by a record changer) without playing.
verb
3
2
One that has been rejected.

A reject from the varsity team; a tire that is a reject.

noun
2
2
To discard or throw out as worthless, useless, or substandard; cast off or out.
verb
2
2
(slang) A foolish or socially inept person.
noun
1
2
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To spit out or vomit.

The baby rejected the medicine.

verb
0
1
(medicine) To resist immunologically the introduction of (a transplanted organ or tissue); fail to accept as part of one's own body.
verb
0
1
To throw up (food); vomit.
verb
0
1
To rebuff; esp., to deny acceptance, care, love, etc. to (someone)

A rejected child.

verb
0
1
(physiol.) To fail to accept immunologically (a part or organ grafted or transplanted into the body)
verb
0
1
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A rejected thing or person.
noun
0
1
To spit out or vomit.

The baby rejected the medicine.

verb
0
1
To react to the introduction of a transplanted organ or tissue with a destructive immune response; fail to accept as part of one's own body.
verb
0
1
To refuse to accept.

She even rejected my improved offer.

verb
0
1
(sports) To block a shot, especially if it sends the ball off the court.
verb
0
1
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Something that is rejected.
noun
0
1
(derogatory slang) An unpopular person.
noun
0
1

Origin of reject

  • Middle English rejecten from Latin rēicere rēiect- re- re- iacere to throw yē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Late Middle English rejecten, from Latin rÄ“iectus, past participle of rÄ“icere, "to throw back", from rÄ“-, back, + iacere, to throw. Displaced native Middle English forwerpen (“to reject") (from Old English forweorpan), Middle English forcasten (“to reject, throw away") (from Old Norse forkasta), Middle English skirpen (“to reject, spew out") (from Old Norse skirpa (“to reject, spit out")), Middle English wernen (“to refuse, reject") (from Old English wiernan (“to refuse, reject")), Middle English withchosen, withchesen (“to reject, choose against") (from Old English wiþċēosan (“to reject")).

    From Wiktionary