Nihilism meaning

nīə-lĭzəm, nē-
The doctrine that nothing actually exists or that existence or values are meaningless.
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The belief that all endeavors are ultimately futile and devoid of meaning.

"...the band members sweat hard enough to earn their pretensions, and maybe even their nihilism" (rock critic Dave Marsh, reviewing the band XTC's album Go)

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Nihilism is extreme skepticism about existence and about religious or moral principles.

A desire for the complete rejection of the established order or social system and religious principles is an example of nihilism.

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Relentless negativity or cynicism suggesting an absence of values or beliefs.

Nihilism in postwar art.

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The belief that there is no meaning or purpose in existence.
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(politics) (capitalized by protagonist Turgenev) A Russian anarchistic revolutionary doctrine (1860-1917) holding that conditions in the social organization are so bad as to make destruction desirable for its own sake, independent of any constructive program or possibility.
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(philosophy) Extreme skepticism, maintaining that nothing has a real existence.
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The deliberate refusal of belief, to the point that belief itself is rejected as untenable.
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A delusion, experienced in some mental disorders, that the world or one's mind, body, or self does not exist.
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Contradiction (not always deliberate) between behavior and espoused principle, to such a degree that all possible espoused principle is voided.
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A delusion, experienced in some mental disorders, that the world or one's mind, body, or self does not exist.
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The doctrine that nothing actually exists or that existence or values are meaningless.
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(ethics) The rejection of all moral principles.
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Origin of nihilism

  • Latin nihil nothing ne in Indo-European roots –ism

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From German Nihilismus, itself from Latin nihil (“nil, nothing") + German -ismus '-ism', coined in 1817 by German philosopher Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi, but repeatedly 'reinvented'.

    From Wiktionary