Faith meaning

fāth
Complete trust, confidence, or reliance.
noun
44
6
Unquestioning belief that does not require proof or evidence.
noun
30
6
A religion or a system of religious beliefs.
noun
23
7
Allegiance to some person or thing; loyalty.
noun
20
5
Anything believed.
noun
16
8
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Unquestioning belief in God, religious tenets, etc.
noun
7
3
Confident or unquestioning belief in the truth, value, or trustworthiness of a person, idea, or thing.
noun
6
3
A trust or confidence in the intentions or abilities of a person, object, or ideal.

I have faith in the goodness of my fellow man.

noun
5
2
Faith is defined as trust or confidence, a belief in religion or God, or a strongly held belief.

If you have complete confidence and trust in your spouse, this is an example of when you have faith in your spouse.

If you believe in God, this is an example of having religious faith and of having faith in God.

If you are a Catholic, then Catholic is an example of your faith.

noun
3
1
An obligation of loyalty or fidelity and the observance of such an obligation.

He acted in good faith to restore broken diplomatic ties after defeating the incumbent.

noun
3
2
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Indeed; in faith.
interjection
2
1
A feeling, conviction, or belief that something is true or real, not contingent upon reason or justification.

Have faith that the criminal justice system will avenge the murder.

I have faith that my prayers will be answered.

I have faith in the healing power of crystals.

noun
2
3
A religious belief system.

The Christian faith.

noun
1
1
A city in South Dakota.
pronoun
1
1
Loyalty to a person or thing; allegiance.

Keeping faith with one's supporters; refused to break faith with his friends.

noun
1
3
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A feminine name.
noun
0
2
A female given name.
pronoun
0
2
in faith
  • Indeed; truly.
idiom
2
0
break (or keep) faith
  • To be disloyal (or loyal) to one's beliefs, principles, etc.
  • To break (or keep) a promise.
idiom
2
0
in faith
  • Indeed; really.
idiom
1
1
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on faith
  • Through trust; without proof or evidence.
idiom
2
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

break (<i>or</i> keep) faith
on faith

Origin of faith

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman fed from Latin fidēs bheidh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • 12th century, from Middle English feith, from Old French feid, from Latin fidēs (“faith, belief, trust”) (whence also English fidelity), from fīdō (“trust, confide in”), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰidʰ-, zero-grade of Proto-Indo-European *bʰeydʰ- (“to command, to persuade, to trust”) (whence also English bide).

    From Wiktionary