Suspicion meaning

sə-spĭshən
Frequency:
Suspicion is having a feeling, thinking or believing that someone is guilty of something.

An example of suspicion is a teacher having a feeling that one of their students cheated on a test.

noun
8
3
The state or feeling of having no confidence or certainty about something; distrust.

Looked with suspicion on the claims in the brochure.

noun
5
1
The condition of being suspected, especially of wrongdoing.

Held under suspicion of murder.

noun
5
2
A very small amount or degree; suggestion; inkling; trace.
noun
3
0
The act or an instance of suspecting something on little or no evidence.

His evasiveness aroused my suspicions.

noun
3
3
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To suspect.
verb
3
3
A minute amount or slight indication; a trace.

A suspicion of contempt in his voice.

noun
2
0
The act or an instance of suspecting guilt, a wrong, harmfulness, etc. with little or no supporting evidence.
noun
2
0
The feeling or state of mind of a person who suspects.
noun
2
0
(informal, dial.) To suspect.
verb
2
0
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The act of suspecting something or someone, especially of something wrong.
noun
2
0
The condition of being suspected.
noun
2
0
noun
2
0

A suspicion of a smile.

noun
2
0
The imagining of something without evidence.
noun
2
0
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(nonstandard, dialect) To suspect; to have suspicions.
verb
0
1
above suspicion
  • not to be suspected; honorable
idiom
0
1
on suspicion
  • on the basis of suspicion; because suspected
idiom
0
1
under suspicion
  • suspected
idiom
0
1

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

above suspicion
on suspicion
under suspicion

Origin of suspicion

  • Middle English alteration (influenced by Old French suspicion) of suspecioun from Anglo-Norman variant of Old French sospeçon from Latin suspectiō suspectiōn- from suspectus past participle of suspicere to watch suspect

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo"French suspecioun, from Old French suspeçun or sospeçon, from Latin suspectionem, of the past participle from suspicere, from sub- (“up to") with specere (“to look at").

    From Wiktionary