Knowledge meaning

nŏlĭj
Knowledge is defined as what is learned, understood or aware of.

An example of knowledge is learning the alphabet.

An example of knowledge is having the ability to find a location.

An example of knowledge is remembering details about an event.

noun
61
10
Awareness of a particular fact or situation; a state of having been informed or made aware of something. [from 14th c.]
noun
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6
The body of facts, principles, etc. acquired through human experience and thought.
noun
34
8
The state or fact of knowing.

Humans naturally aspire to knowledge.

noun
27
6
All that has been perceived or grasped by the mind; learning; enlightenment.
noun
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5
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An awareness of factual information. Includes actual knowledge (positive or definite), personal knowledge (based on one’s own observation), and constructive knowledge (based on other circumstances).
noun
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4
Acquaintance with facts; range of information, awareness, or understanding.
noun
10
1
The total of what is known; all information and products of learning. [from 16th c.]

His library contained the accumulated knowledge of the Greeks and Romans.

noun
9
2
Familiarity, awareness, or understanding gained through experience or study.

Has great knowledge of these parts; has only limited knowledge of chemistry.

noun
9
4
Familiarity or understanding of a particular skill, branch of learning etc. [from 14th c.]

Does your friend have any knowledge of hieroglyphs, perchance?

noun
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(countable) Something that can be known; a branch of learning; a piece of information; a science. [from 16th c.]
noun
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0
The act, fact, or state of knowing.
  • Acquaintance or familiarity (with a fact, place, etc.)
  • Awareness.
  • Understanding.
noun
7
1
(archaic) Carnal knowledge.
noun
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2
The fact of knowing about something; general understanding or familiarity with a subject, place, situation etc. [from 14th c.]

His knowledge of Iceland was limited to what he'd seen on the Travel Channel.

noun
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0
The sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned.

The extraordinary knowledge housed in the library.

noun
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1
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(archaic) Carnal knowledge.
noun
5
1
Intellectual understanding; the state of appreciating truth or information. [from 14th c.]

Knowledge consists in recognizing the difference between good and bad decisions.

noun
3
1
(archaic or law) Sexual intimacy or intercourse (now usually in phrase carnal knowledge). [from 15th c.]
noun
3
3
(obsolete) To confess as true; to acknowledge. [13th-17th c.]
verb
2
0
to (the best of) one's knowledge
  • as far as one knows; within the range of one's information
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of knowledge

  • Middle English knoulech knouen to know know -leche n. suff

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The noun originally provided a counterpart to the now-obsolete verb to knowledge (see below), but was very early adapted to be the noun equivalent of know.

    From Wiktionary