Lore meaning

lôr
The backstory created around a fictional universe.
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Accumulated knowledge or beliefs held by a group about a subject, especially when passed from generation to generation by oral tradition.
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The space between the eye and the upper edge of the bill of a bird or between the eye and the nostril of a snake or fish.
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Lore is defined as something being taught or knowledge, especially traditional knowledge, or the space between the eyes and nostril of a snake, or the space between the eyes and upper edge of a bird bill.

An example of lore is an ancient, mythical story about how the fox came to be.

An example of a lore is a snake's face from its eyes to its nostrils.

noun
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All the facts and traditions about a particular subject that have been accumulated over time through education or experience.

The lore of the Ancient Egyptians.

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(anatomy) The anterior portion of the cheeks of insects.
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Knowledge or learning; specif., all the knowledge of a particular group or having to do with a particular subject, esp. that of a traditional nature.
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(obsolete) Past tense of lose.
verb
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(anatomy) The region between the eyes and nostrils of birds, reptiles, and amphibians.
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The space between the eye and the base of the bill of a bird or between the eye and nostril of a snake.
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The space between the eye and the base of the bill of a bird or between the eye and nostril of a snake.
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Origin of lore

  • Middle English from Old English lār leis-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Latin lōrum thong

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English lore, from Old English lār, from West Germanic *laizā, from Proto-Germanic *laizō, from *laizijanÄ… (“to teach"). Cognate with Dutch leer, German Lehre. See also learn.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin lorum (“thong, strap")

    From Wiktionary