Fable meaning

fābəl
A fictitious story meant to teach a moral lesson: the characters are usually talking animals.
noun
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A falsehood; a lie.
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The definition of a fable is a short story to teach a lesson, often with animals behaving as humans, or a story that is a lie.

An example of a fable is the story of the tortoise and the hare.

A lie about the big fish that got away is an example of a fable.

noun
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A story that is not true; falsehood.
noun
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Fiction; untruth; falsehood.
noun
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To compose fables.
verb
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To recount as if true.
verb
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A fictitious narrative intended to enforce some useful truth or precept, usually with animals, birds etc as characters; an apologue. Prototypically, Aesop's Fables.
noun
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(archaic) The plot of a literary work.
noun
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To write or tell (fables, legends, or falsehoods)
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Any story told to excite wonder; common talk; the theme of talk.
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The plot, story, or connected series of events forming the subject of an epic or dramatic poem.
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(intransitive, archaic) To compose fables; hence, to write or speak fiction ; to write or utter what is not true.
verb
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(archaic) To feign; to invent; to devise, and speak of, as true or real; to tell of falsely.
verb
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A usually short narrative making an edifying or cautionary point and often employing as characters animals that speak and act like humans.
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A story about legendary persons and exploits.
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A myth or legend.
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Origin of fable

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin fābula from fārī to speak bhā-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old French fable, from Latin fabula, from fari (“to speak, say”). See Ban, and compare fabulous, fame.

    From Wiktionary