Parable definition

părə-bəl
Frequency:
A short, simple story, usually of an occurrence of a familiar kind, from which a moral or religious lesson may be drawn.
noun
27
6
A simple story illustrating a moral or religious lesson.
noun
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11
The definition of a parable is a simple story with a moral or a story told to teach a lesson.

An example of a parable is the story about the boy who cried wolf, which is used to teach kids not to lie.

noun
6
2
To represent by parable.

Which by the ancient sages was thus parabled. "” Milton.

verb
1
1
A short narrative illustrating a lesson (usually religious/moral) by comparison or analogy.

In the New Testament the parables told by Jesus convey His message, as in "The parable of the prodigal son"

Catholic sermons normally draw on at least one Biblical lecture, often parables.

noun
2
3
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(obsolete) That can easily be prepared or procured; obtainable.

adjective
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1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
parable
Plural:
parables

Origin of parable

  • Middle English from Old French from Late Latin parabola from Greek parabolē from paraballein to compare para- beside para–1 ballein to throw gwelə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French (=modern) parabole, from Late Latin parabola, from Ancient Greek παραβολή (parabolÄ“, “putting aside").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin parābilis, from parāre (“to prepare, procure").

    From Wiktionary