Lion meaning

līən
Frequency:
The definition of a lion is a large feline mammal that eats meat and comes from northwest India and Africa, or a brave or strong person.

An example of a lion is the Angola.

An example of a lion is a person who is not afraid of great physical dangers.

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A large, powerful cat (Panthera leo), found in Africa and SW Asia, with a tawny coat, a tufted tail, and, in the adult male, a shaggy mane: in folklore and fable the lion is king of beasts.
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A person of great courage or strength.
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A prominent person who is in demand socially; celebrity.
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A big cat, Panthera leo, native to Africa, India and formerly to much of Europe. The term may apply to the species as a whole, to individuals, or to male individuals. It also applies to related species like mountain lions.

Tigers and lions share a common ancestor from a few million years ago.

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A Chinese foo dog.
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An individual who shows strength and courage, attributes associated with the lion.
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(1) (LiOn) See lithium ion.
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A famous person regarded with interest and curiosity.
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A large carnivorous feline mammal (Panthera leo) of Africa and northwest India, having a short tawny coat, a tufted tail, and, in the male, a heavy mane around the neck and shoulders.
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A mountain lion.
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(heraldry) A stylized representation of a large cat, used on a coat of arms.
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lion's share
  • The greatest or best part.
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beard the lion (in his den)
  • to approach, oppose, etc. an influential or feared person, as in a place where that person has the advantage
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the Lion
  • Leo, the constellation and fifth sign of the zodiac
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of lion

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin leō leōn- from Greek leōn of Semitic origin lbℵ in Semitic roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French lion, from Latin leō, (genitive: leōnis), from Ancient Greek λέων (leōn), likely a borrowing from a Semitic language; compare Proto-Semitic *labiʾ-. Many ancient languages possessed similar words for lion, including Akkadian 𒌨 (labbu) . It is unclear as to who borrowed the word from whom, though the ultimate source is likely non-Indo-European.

    From Wiktionary