Pedantry meaning

pĕdn-trē
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An instance of pedantic behavior.

Grew tired of his pedantries.

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Pedantry is an excessive attention to the rules or paying strong attention to the minor points of learning.

An example of pedantry is a friend standing in line for a show not letting another friend cut in line in front of them.

An example of pedantry is a teacher insisting that the students learn the minute, obscure details of a subject.

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The ostentatious display of academic knowledge, or undue attention paid to minor details or formal rules.

His detailed research was dismissed as pedantry.

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The qualities, practices, etc. of a pedant; ostentatious display of knowledge, or an instance of this.
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An arbitrary adherence to rules and forms.
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An excessive attention to detail or rules.
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An instance of such behaviour.

I don't want to listen to your pedantries anymore.

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An overly ambitious display of learning.
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Origin of pedantry

  • pedant + -ry. From Middle French pedant, pedante, from Italian pedante (“a teacher, schoolmaster, pedant"), of uncertain origin, traced by some sources to Latin paedagogans, present participle of paedagogare (= to teach, from Greek "paedagogein" = to instruct children). Confer French pédanterie.

    From Wiktionary