Trace meaning

trās
One of two side straps or chains connecting a harnessed draft animal to a vehicle or whiffletree.
noun
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Trace means to follow along a route, to a copy something by following along or to find something or someone.

An example of to trace is to follow the same route as a prior traveler.

An example of to trace is to draw over a picture to copy it onto a new piece of paper.

An example of to trace is to track down a criminal.

verb
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An engram.
noun
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A line drawn by a recording instrument, such as a cardiograph.
noun
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Trace is defined as evidence or a visible mark, or a very small amount of something.

An example of a trace is a footprint at a crime scene.

An example of a trace is a small smile, a trace of a smile.

noun
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The definition of trace is happening in very small amounts.

An example of trace used as an adjective is in the phrase "trace substances," which means substances of which there are tiny amounts.

adjective
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A path or trail that has been beaten out by the passage of animals or people.
noun
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An act of researching or ascertaining the origin or location of something.

Put a trace on the phone call; asked for a trace on a lost package.

noun
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To record (a variable), as on a graph.
verb
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To make one's way along a trail or course.

We traced along the ridge.

verb
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To have origins; be traceable.

Linguistic features that trace to West Africa.

verb
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Occurring in extremely small amounts or in quantities less than a standard limit.
adjective
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A bar or rod, hinged at either end to another part, that transfers movement from one part of a machine to another.
noun
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A way followed or path taken.
noun
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A beaten path or trail left by the repeated passage of persons, vehicles, etc.
noun
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Any perceptible mark left by a past person, thing, or event; sign; evidence; vestige.

The traces of war.

noun
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A barely perceptible amount; very small quantity.

A trace of anger.

noun
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Something drawn or traced, as a mark, sketch, etc.
noun
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The traced record of a recording instrument.
noun
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A very small amount, usually one quantitatively immeasurable.
noun
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Precipitation amounting to less than 0.127 mm (0.005 in)
noun
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noun
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To move along, follow, or traverse (a path, route, etc.)
verb
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To follow the trail or footprints of; track.
verb
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To discover or ascertain by investigating traces or vestiges of (something prehistoric, etc.)
verb
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To ornament with tracery.
verb
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To copy (a drawing, etc.) by following its lines on a superimposed transparent sheet.
verb
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To form (letters, etc.) carefully or laboriously.
verb
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To make or copy with a tracer.
verb
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To record by means of a curved, broken, or wavy line, as in a seismograph.
verb
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To follow a path, route, development, etc.; make one's way.
verb
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To go back or date back (to something past)
verb
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Either of two straps, chains, etc. connecting a draft animal's harness to the vehicle drawn.
noun
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A rod, pivoted at each end, that transmits motion from one moving part of a machine to another.
noun
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An act of tracing.

Your cell phone company can put a trace on your line.

noun
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A mark left as a sign of passage of a person or animal.
noun
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A very small amount.

All of our chocolates may contain traces of nuts.

noun
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(electronics) An electric current-carrying conductive pathway on a printed circuit board.
noun
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An informal road or prominent path in an arid area.
noun
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One of two straps, chains, or ropes of a harness, extending from the collar or breastplate to a whippletree attached to a vehicle or thing to be drawn; a tug.
noun
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(fortification) The ground plan of a work or works.
noun
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The intersection of a plane of projection, or an original plane, with a coordinate plane.
noun
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(mathematics) The sum of the diagonal elements of a square matrix.
noun
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To follow the trail of.

verb
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To follow the history of.
verb
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To draw or sketch lightly or with care.

He carefully traced the outlines of the old building before him.

verb
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To copy onto a sheet of paper superimposed over the original, by drawing over its lines.
verb
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A mark, footprint, etc. left by the passage of a person, animal, or thing.
noun
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kick over the traces
  • To act in a way that contravenes social expectations or propriety:.
idiom
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kick over the traces
  • To shake off control; show insubordination or independence.
idiom
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Origin of trace

  • Middle English track from Old French from tracier to trace from Vulgar Latin tractiāre from Latin tractus a dragging, course from past participle of trahere to draw
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English trais from Old French pl. of trait a hauling, harness strap from Latin tractus a hauling from past participle of trahere to haul
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English tracen, from Old French tracer, trasser (“to delineate, score, trace", also, "to follow, pursue"), probably a conflation of Medieval Latin *tractiāre (“to delineate, score, trace"), from Latin trahere (“to draw"); and Old French traquer (“to chase, hunt, pursue"), from Old French trac (“a track, trace"), from Middle Dutch treck, treke (“a drawing, draft, delineation, feature, expedition"). More at track.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English trace, traas, from Old French trace (“an outline, track, trace"), from the verb (see below).
    From Wiktionary