Tincture definition

tĭngkchər
(pharmacy) A dilute solution consisting of a medicinal substance in alcohol or in alcohol and water, usually 10% to 20% by volume: tinctures are more dilute than fluid extracts and more volatile than spirits.
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A coloring or dyeing substance; a pigment.
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An imparted color; a tint.
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A quality that colors, pervades, or distinguishes.
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To stain or tint with a color.
verb
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To color lightly; tint; tinge.
verb
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A trace or vestige.
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An alcohol solution of a nonvolatile medicine.

Tincture of iodine.

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(heraldry) A metal, color, or fur.
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(obs.) A dye.
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A light color; tint; tinge.
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A slight admixture or infusion of some substance or quality; trace, smattering, etc.
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(heraldry) Any color, metal, or fur.
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To imbue or permeate lightly with some substance or quality.

A message tinctured with hope.

verb
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An alcohol solution of a nonvolatile medicine.

Tincture of iodine.

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A pigment or other substance that colours or dyes.
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A tint, or an added colour.
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(heraldry) A colour or metal used in the depiction of a coat of arms.
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An alcoholic extract of plant material, used as a medicine.
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(humorous) A small alcoholic drink.
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An essential characteristic.
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The finer and more volatile parts of a substance, separated by a solvent; an extract of a part of the substance of a body communicated to the solvent.
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A slight taste superadded to any substance.

A tincture of orange peel.

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A slight quality added to anything; a tinge.
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To stain or impregnate (something) with colour.
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To infuse, as with a quality; impregnate.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
tincture
Plural:
tinctures

Origin of tincture

  • Middle English from Latin tīnctūra a dyeing from tīnctus past participle of tingere to dye

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English, from Latin tinctura, from the verb tingo. Compare tint, taint.

    From Wiktionary