Shadow meaning

shădō
Shadow is defined as either a dark part of something or to an area of complete darkness.

An example of shadow is a dark or shaded area on a photograph.

An example of shadow is a pitch dark alley from where a scary figure emerges.

An example of shadow is when your lamp falls in such a way that you a part of the page of your book looks much darker than other parts of the page.

noun
27
6
The definition of a shadow is a reflection of something produced by light hitting the object or someone who follows another person around.

An example of shadow is when you see your silhouette on the ground when you go outside on a sunny day.

An example of shadow is a faithful dog that follows behind you all day.

noun
17
6
An insignificant portion or amount; a trace.

Beyond a shadow of a doubt.

noun
8
7
Shadow is something that lasts only for a moment or is just a hint of something.

An example of shadow is when it looks like war might end and we'll have peace, but then the conflict immediately starts again.

An example of shadow is when you have a tiny little doubt about whether the prison you are about to marry is right for you.

noun
8
8
To represent vaguely, mysteriously, or prophetically; foreshadow.
verb
5
4
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A close or constant companion.
noun
4
1
A faint indication; a foreshadowing.

A shadow of things to come.

noun
3
0
To stay close to or follow, esp. in secret, so as to observe the movements and activities of.
verb
2
0
To change gradually.
verb
2
0
A type of lettering form of word processors that makes a cubic effect.
noun
2
0
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Shelter; protection.

Under the shadow of their corporate sponsor.

noun
2
1
To become downcast or gloomy.

Her face shadowed with sorrow.

verb
1
0
A shaded area in a picture or X-ray.
noun
1
0
Protection or shelter.
noun
1
0
To throw a shadow upon.
verb
1
0
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To become shadowy or clouded (with doubt, sorrow, etc.)
verb
1
0
Of or belonging to a shadow cabinet.

A shadow minister.

adjective
1
0
Darker, indistinct, not plainly perceived, etc.
adjective
1
0
A dark image projected onto a surface where light is blocked by the shade of an object.

My shadow lengthened as the sun began to set.

noun
1
0
Relative darkness, especially as caused by the interruption of light; gloom, obscurity.

I immediately jumped into shadow as I saw them approach.

noun
1
0
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That which looms as though a shadow.

I don't have a shadow of doubt in my mind that my plan will succeed. The shadow of fear of my being outed always affects how I live my life. I lived in her shadow my whole life.

noun
1
0
A small degree; a shade.

He did not give even a shadow of respect to the professor.

noun
1
0
An imperfect and faint representation.

He came back from war the shadow of a man.

noun
1
0
An influence, especially a pervasive or a negative one.
noun
1
0
A spirit; a ghost; a shade.
noun
1
0
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To block light or radio transmission.

Looks like that cloud's going to shadow us.

verb
1
0
(espionage) To secretly or discreetly track or follow another, to keep under surveillance.
verb
1
0
(programming) To make an identifier, usually a variable, inaccessible by declaring another of the same name within the scope of the first.
verb
1
0
(computing) To apply the shadowing process to (the contents of ROM).
verb
1
0
A feeling or cause of gloom or unhappiness.

The argument cast a shadow on their friendship.

noun
1
1
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To cast a shadow on; darken or shade.

The leaves of the trees shadowed the ferns below.

verb
1
1
To make gloomy or troubled, especially over time.

He was shadowed by self-doubt.

verb
1
1
To darken in a painting or drawing; shade in.
verb
1
1
Not having official status.

A shadow government of exiled leaders; a shadow cabinet.

adjective
1
1
A definite area of shade on a surface, caused by a body blocking light rays.
noun
1
1
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The dark image made by such a body.
noun
1
1
The growing darkness after sunset.
noun
1
1
A dark area, as of a very short growth of beard.
noun
1
1
A mirrored image; reflection.
noun
1
1
A vague indication or omen; prefiguration.

Shadows of things to come.

noun
1
1
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A person who trails another closely, as a detective or spy.
noun
1
1
To make dark or gloomy; cloud.
verb
1
1
To represent vaguely, mystically, or prophetically; prefigure.
verb
1
1
One who secretly or furtively follows another.

The constable was promoted to working as a shadow for the Royals.

noun
1
1
in the shadow of
  • Very close to; verging upon.
  • Under the influence or domination of.
idiom
1
0
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under the shadow of
  • In danger of; apparently fated for.
idiom
1
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

in the shadow of

Origin of shadow

  • Middle English from Old English sceaduwe oblique case of sceadu shade, shadow

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English schadowe, schadewe, schadwe (also schade > shade), from Old English sceaduwe, sceadwe, oblique form of sceadu (“shadow, shade; darkness; protection"), from Proto-Germanic *skadwaz (“shade, shadow"), from Proto-Indo-European *skot- (“darkness"). Cognate with Scots scaddow, schaddow (“shadow"), Saterland Frisian Skaad (“shade, shadow"), Dutch schaduw (“shadow"), German Schatten (“shadow, shade"), Norwegian skodde (“fog, mist"), Irish scáth (“shadow"), Ancient Greek σκότος (skótos, “darkness, gloom").

    From Wiktionary