Eclipse definition

ĭ-klĭps
To cause an eclipse of; darken or obscure.
verb
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1
To make seem less brilliant, famous, etc. by being even more so; overshadow; outshine; surpass.
verb
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4
Of astronomical bodies, to cause an eclipse.

The Moon eclipsed the Sun.

verb
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1
A temporary or permanent dimming or cutting off of light.
noun
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Obscurity, decline, downfall.
noun
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To overshadow; to be better or more noticeable than.

The student’s skills soon eclipsed those of his teacher.

verb
2
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(Irish grammar) To undergo eclipsis.
verb
2
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A dimming or extinction, as of fame or glory.
noun
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5
Any overshadowing or cutting off of light.
noun
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4
A seasonal state of plumage in some birds, notably ducks, adopted temporarily after the breeding season and characterised by a dull and scruffy appearance.
noun
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1
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The period of time during which such an obscuration occurs.
noun
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0
A disgraceful or humiliating end; a downfall.

Revelations of wrongdoing helped bring about the eclipse of the governor's career.

noun
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To cause an eclipse of.
verb
1
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To obscure; darken.
verb
1
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To obscure or diminish in importance, fame, or reputation.
verb
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0
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To surpass; outshine.

An outstanding performance that eclipsed the previous record.

verb
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Eclipse is defined as to obscure the light of something or to make less important.

An example of eclipse is to block out the light of the sun.

An example of eclipse is for one athlete to outshine another.

verb
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1
The partial or complete obscuring, relative to a designated observer, of one celestial body by another.
noun
1
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A fall into obscurity or disuse; a decline.
noun
1
1
The definition of an eclipse is an obscuring of light, particularly of the sun or moon or a loss of greatness.

An example of eclipse is when the sun becomes blocked out for a few moments during the day.

An example of eclipse is a demotion from a high job position.

noun
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(astronomy) An alignment of astronomical objects in which a planetary object (for example, the Moon) comes between the Sun and another planetary object (for example, the Earth), resulting in a shadow being cast by the middle planetary object onto the other planetary object.
noun
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The partial or total obscuring of one celestial body by another, esp. of the sun when the moon comes between it and the earth (called solar eclipse), or of the moon when the earth's shadow is cast upon it (called lunar eclipse)
noun
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The partial or total blocking of light of one celestial object by another. An eclipse of the Sun or Moon occurs when the Earth, Moon, and Sun are aligned. &diamf3; In a solar eclipse the Moon comes between the Sun and Earth. During a total solar eclipse the disk of the Moon fully covers that of the Sun, and only the Sun's corona is visible. &diamf3; An annular eclipse occurs when the Moon is farthest in its orbit from the Earth so that its disk does not fully cover that of the Sun, and part of the Sun's photosphere is visible as a ring around the Moon. &diamf3; In a lunar eclipse all or a part of the Moon's disk enters the umbra of the Earth's shadow and is no longer illuminated by the Sun. Lunar eclipses occur only during a full moon, when the Moon is directly opposite the Sun.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
eclipse
Plural:
eclipses

Origin of eclipse

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin eclīpsis from Greek ekleipsis from ekleipein to fail to appear, suffer an eclipse ek- out ecto– leipein to leave leikw- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French eclipse, from Latin eclīpsis, from Ancient Greek ἔκλειψις (ekleipsis, “eclipse”), from ἐκλείπω (ekleipō, “I abandon, got missing, vanish”), from ἐκ (ek, “out”) and λείπω (leipō, “I leave behind”).

    From Wiktionary