Haunt meaning

hônt, hŏnt
To visit often; frequent.

Haunted the movie theaters.

verb
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A feeding place for animals.
noun
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To haunt is defined as to appear as a ghost, or to visit or appear often.

An example of to haunt is seeing visions of a relative who has passed every time you're in their bedroom.

An example of to haunt is going to the same cafe for lunch every day.

An example of to haunt is stalking someone.

verb
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To inhabit, visit, or appear to in the form of a ghost or other supernatural being.
verb
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To make uneasy, restless.

The memory of his past failures haunted him.

verb
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To come to the mind of continually; obsess.

A riddle that haunted me all morning.

verb
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To be continually present in; pervade.

The melancholy that haunts the composer's music.

verb
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To recur or visit often, especially as a ghost.
verb
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A place much frequented.
noun
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(chiefly southern us) A ghost or other supernatural being.
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To visit (a place) often or continually; frequent.
verb
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To seek the company or companionship of; run after.
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To appear or recur repeatedly to, often to the point of obsession.

Memories haunted her.

verb
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To be associated with; fill the atmosphere of; pervade.

Memories of former gaiety haunt the house.

verb
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(dial.) A ghost.
noun
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To inhabit, or visit frequently (most often used in reference to ghosts).

A couple of ghosts haunt the old, burnt-down house.

verb
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To stalk, to follow.

The policeman haunted him, following him everywhere.

verb
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(intransitive, now rare) To live habitually; to stay, to remain.
verb
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(UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To accustom; habituate; make accustomed to.
verb
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(UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To practise; to devote oneself to.
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(intransitive) To persist in staying or visiting.
verb
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A place at which one is regularly found; a hangout.
noun
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(dialect) A ghost.
noun
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Origin of haunt

  • Middle English haunten to frequent from Old French hanter tkei- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English haunten (“to reside, inhabit, use, employ”), from Old French hanter (“to inhabit, frequent, resort to”), of Germanic origin, probably through Gothic *[script?] (haimatjan, “to lead home”), from Proto-Germanic *haimatjaną (“to house, bring home”), from Proto-Germanic *haimaz (“village, home”), from Proto-Indo-European *kōim- (“village”). Cognate with Old English hāmettan (“to provide housing to, bring home”), Old Norse heimta (“to bring home, fetch”) (Swedish hämta); related to Old English hām (“home, village”), Old French hantin (“a stay, a place frequented by”) from the same Germanic source. More at home.

    From Wiktionary