Gloom meaning

glo͝om
A dark or dim place.
noun
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The definition of gloom is to feel or act sad.

An example of gloom is to become very sad with the death of a friend.

verb
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Gloom is defined as darkness or a dark and gloomy place, or it is defined as a state of being depressed and in a bad mood.

The shadows and darkness in an abandon house are an example of gloom.

When you sit around all day in your room and cry because your boyfriend broke up with you, this is an example of gloom.

noun
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To be or become dark, shaded, or obscure.
verb
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To feel, appear, or act despondent, sad, or mournful.
verb
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To make dark, shaded, or obscure.
verb
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To make despondent; sadden.
verb
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To be or look morose, displeased, or dejected.
verb
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To be, become, or appear dark, dim, or dismal.
verb
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To make dark, dismal, dejected, etc.
verb
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Darkness; dimness; obscurity.
noun
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Deep sadness or hopelessness.
noun
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The gloom of a forest, or of midnight.

noun
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Cloudiness or heaviness of mind; melancholy; aspect of sorrow; low spirits; dullness.
noun
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noun
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(intransitive) To be dark or gloomy.
verb
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(intransitive) To look or feel sad, sullen or despondent.
verb
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To render gloomy or dark; to obscure; to darken.
verb
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To fill with gloom; to make sad, dismal, or sullen.
verb
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To shine or appear obscurely or imperfectly; to glimmer.
verb
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Origin of gloom

  • Probably from Middle English gloumen to become dark, look glum
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English *gloom, *glom, from Old English glōm (“gloaming, twilight, darkness”), from Proto-Germanic *glōmaz (“gleam, shimmer, sheen”), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰel- (“to gleam, shimmer, glow”). Cognate with Norwegian glom (“transparent membrane”).
    From Wiktionary