Propaganda meaning

prŏp'ə-găn'də
Propaganda presents the facts selectively in order to encourage people to come to a particular conclusion.
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Propaganda is defined as the systematic, widespread distribution of specific ideas, doctrines, practices which can help one cause or be harmful to another cause.
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A concerted set of messages aimed at influencing the opinions or behavior of large numbers of people.
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Propaganda often delivers loaded messages designed to produce an emotional rather than rational response to the information that is being presented.
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Propaganda may also take the form of reports, publications, and leaflets targeted to a particular segment of the population.
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Ideas, doctrines, or allegations so spread.
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Propaganda messages can be delivered as part of the mainstream news media, including through music, magazines, movies, and television shows.
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Techniques used in propaganda can include appeals to fear, statements of prejudice, black and white fallacies, disinformation, demonizing the enemy, flag waving, intentional vagueness, oversimplification, and scapegoating.
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The most effective propaganda campaigns are based upon the truth.

An example of propaganda is a brochure that talks badly about a political candidate.

An example of propaganda is a film about good hygeine.

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The systematic propagation of a doctrine or cause or of information reflecting the views and interests of those advocating such a doctrine or cause.
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Material disseminated by the advocates or opponents of a doctrine or cause.

Wartime propaganda.

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A committee of cardinals, the Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith, in charge of the foreign missions.
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Any systematic, widespread dissemination or promotion of particular ideas, doctrines, practices, etc. to further one's own cause or to damage an opposing one.
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It is common for propaganda to be aimed at children and young adults, because they lack the critical reasoning skills and contextual comprehension abilities to help determine the objectivity of a particular message.
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Origin of propaganda

  • Earlier organization for the propagation of a practice or point of view from Propaganda short for New Latin Sacra Congregātiō dē Prōpagandā Fidē the Sacred Congregation for Propagating the Faith, a division of the Roman Curia established in 1622 to promote the evangelization of non-Christian peoples and the spread of the Roman Catholic Church in other Christian communities from Latin prōpāgandā ablative feminine gerundive of prōpāgāre to propagate propagate
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From New Latin propāganda, short for Congregātiō dÄ“ Propagandā Fide, "congregation for propagating the faith", a committee of cardinals established 1622 by Gregory XV to supervise foreign missions, and properly the ablative feminine gerundive of Latin propāgō (“propagate") (see English propagation). Modern political sense dates from World War I, not originally pejorative.
    From Wiktionary