Doctrine meaning

dŏktrĭn
Frequency:
Doctrine is defined as a principle or group of principles which are taught by a religion or political party.

An example of doctrine is the teaching of the Ten Commandments in Christianity.

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Something taught; a teaching.
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A widely accepted legal tenet.
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A rule or principle of law, especially when established by precedent.
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A principle or body of principles presented for acceptance or belief, as by a religious, political, scientific, or philosophic group; dogma.
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Something taught; teachings.
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A statement of official government policy, especially in foreign affairs and military strategy.
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The definition of doctrine is an official statement of policy about how two countries interact.

An example of doctrine is the Truman Doctrine, that said the US would work to contain the Soviet Union.

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A rule, theory, or principle of law.
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An official statement of a nation's policy, esp. toward other nations.

The Monroe Doctrine.

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A belief or tenet, especially about philosophical or theological matters.
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The body of teachings of a religion, or a religious leader, organization, group or text.

The incarnation is a basic doctrine of classical Christianity.

The four noble truths summarise the main doctrines of Buddhism.

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Something taught as the principles or creed of a religion, political party, etc.; tenet or tenets; belief; dogma.
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Origin of doctrine

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin doctrīna from doctor teacher doctor

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin doctrina (“teaching, instruction, learning, knowledge”), from doctor (“a teacher”), from docere (“to teach”); see doctor.

    From Wiktionary