Dogma meaning

dôg'mə, dŏg'-
Dogma is defined as principles or rules that cannot be questioned, or articles of faith in different religions.

An example of dogma is the Ten Commandments in the Christian faith.

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A principle or statement of ideas, or a group of such principles or statements, especially when considered to be authoritative or accepted uncritically.
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A doctrine; tenet; belief.
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Doctrines, tenets, or beliefs, collectively.
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A doctrine or body of doctrines formally and authoritatively affirmed.
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An authoritative principle, belief or statement of opinion, especially one considered to be absolutely true regardless of evidence, or without evidence to support it.

The unforgiving dogma of Stalinism is that what the party leader, however cruel and incompetent, decrees, however absurd, must be accepted as law.

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A doctrine (set of doctrines) relating to matters such as morality and faith, set forth authoritatively by a religious organization or leader.

In the Catholic Church, new dogmas can only be declared by the pope after the extremely rare procedure ex cathedra to make them part of the official faith.

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A positive, arrogant assertion of opinion.
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A doctrine or a corpus of doctrines relating to matters such as morality and faith, set forth in an authoritative manner by a religion.
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Origin of dogma

  • Latin from Greek opinion, belief from dokein to seem, think dek- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Latin dogma (“philosophical tenet”), from Ancient Greek δόγμα (dogma, “opinion, tenet”), from δοκέω (dokeō, “I seem good, think”) (more at decent). Treated in the 17c. -18c. as Greek, with plural dogmata.
    From Wiktionary