Char definition

chär
To become scorched.
verb
1
1
Charter.
abbreviation
1
1
To reduce to charcoal by burning.
verb
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0
To burn slightly; scorch.
verb
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0
Anything charred; esp., charcoal.
noun
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noun
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(brit., informal) A charwoman.
noun
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(chiefly brit., informal) To work as a charwoman.
verb
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Any of a genus (Salvelinus) of trouts with small scales and a red belly.
noun
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noun
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Character.
abbreviation
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An odd job, a chore or piece of housework.
noun
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0
A charlady, a woman employed to do housework; cleaning lady.

“I had to scrub the kitchen today, because the char couldn’t come”

noun
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To work, especially to do housework; to work by the day, without being a regularly hired servant.
verb
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To work or hew (stone, etc.).

verb
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One of the several species of fishes of the genus Salvelinus or the brook trout.

“Among other native delicacies, they give you fresh char.”

noun
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(ergative) To burn something to charcoal.
verb
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To burn slightly or superficially so as to affect colour.
verb
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0
A charred substance.
noun
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(computing, programming) A character (text element such as a letter or symbol), whose data size is commonly one or several bytes.
noun
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(UK) Tea (drink)
noun
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A nickname for Charlotte.
pronoun
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To burn the surface of; scorch.
verb
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1
To reduce to carbon or charcoal by incomplete combustion.
verb
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1
To become reduced to carbon or charcoal.
verb
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1
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A substance that has been scorched, burned, or reduced to charcoal.
noun
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1
Any of several salmonid fishes of the genus Salvelinus, usually having a dark body with light spots, and including the arctic char, the brook trout, and the lake trout.
noun
0
1
A charwoman.
noun
0
1
To work as a charwoman.
verb
0
1

Alternative Forms

Alternative Form of char - chare, charr

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
char
Plural:
chars

Origin of char

  • Middle English a piece of work from Old English cierr a turning

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Back-formation from charcoal

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English cherre (“odd job”), from Old English ċierr (“a turn, change, time, occasion, affair, business”), from ċierran (“to turn, change, turn oneself, go, come, proceed, turn back, return, regard, translate, persuade, convert, be converted, agree to, submit, make to submit, reduce”), from Proto-Germanic *karzijaną (“to turn”), from Proto-Indo-European *gers- (“to bend, turn”). Cognate with Dutch keer (“a time, turn, occasion”), German Kehre (“a turn, bight, bend”), Greek γύρος (gýros, “a bout, whirl”), gyre. Compare Sanskrit "char" (to do), "kri" (to do), "kar" (to perform), and Persian کار (kar, “work”). More at chore, ajar.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Mandarin (chá), with intrusive r.

    From Wiktionary

  • Origin unknown, perhaps from Celtic.

    From Wiktionary

  • Back-formation from charcoal.

    From Wiktionary

  • Abbreviation of character.

    From Wiktionary