Prune meaning

pro͝on
The definition of a prune is a partially dried plum, or is slang for an ill-tempered and unpleasant person.

An example of a prune is a Casselman.

An example of a prune is someone who gets angry when told to stop playing in the traffic.

noun
9
2
To prune is defined as to cut off the excess or dead parts.

An example of to prune is to trim dead leaves off a plant.

An example of to prune is to reduce the number of jobs in a company.

verb
8
1
To remove or cut out as superfluous.
verb
7
2
To make a facial expression exhibiting ill temper or disgust.
verb
5
0
To cut off or remove dead or living parts or branches of (a plant, for example) to improve shape or growth.
verb
4
2
Advertisement
To reduce.

Prune a budget.

verb
3
0
To cut away or remove unnecessary parts.
verb
3
0
A plum dried for eating.
noun
2
0
To remove dead or living parts from (a plant) so as to increase fruit or flower production or improve the form.
verb
2
0
(slang) An old woman, especially a wrinkly one.
noun
2
0
Advertisement
To remove what is superfluous or undesirable.
verb
1
0
Any of various varieties of plum that can be dried without spoiling.
noun
1
0
(informal) A sour or disagreeable person.
noun
1
0
To cut out or get rid of as being unnecessary.
verb
1
0
The dried, wrinkled fruit of certain species of plum.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
To remove excess material from a tree or shrub; to trim, especially to make more healthy or productive.

A good grape grower will prune his vines once a year.

verb
1
0
(figuratively) To cut down or shorten (by the removal of unnecessary material).

To prune a budget, or an essay.

verb
1
0
(slang) An ill-tempered, stupid, or incompetent person.
noun
1
1
To reduce or diminish by removing what is unnecessary.
verb
1
1
(obs.) To preen or dress up.
verb
0
1
Advertisement

Origin of prune

  • Middle English prouinen from Old French proignier perhaps from Vulgar Latin prōretundiāre Latin prō- in front pro–1 Latin rotundus round (from rota wheel ret- in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French from Vulgar Latin prūna from Latin prūnum plum

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French prune, from Latin prÅ«num, from Ancient Greek προῦνον (prounon), variant of προῦμνον (proumnon, “plum"), a loanword from a language of Asia Minor.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old French proignier (“to trim the feathers with the beak"), earlier prooignier, ultimately from Latin pro- ("front") + rotundus (“round") 'to round-off the front'.

    From Wiktionary